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See also: stérile

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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French stérile, from Latin sterilis (barren, futile). See also Ancient Greek στεῖρα (steîra).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

sterile (comparative more sterile, superlative most sterile)

  1. (not comparable) Unable to reproduce (or procreate).
    • 1658, Thomas Browne, “The Garden of Cyrus. []. Chapter V.”, in Hydriotaphia, Urne-buriall, [] Together with The Garden of Cyrus, [], London: Printed for Hen[ry] Brome [], OCLC 48702491; reprinted as Hydriotaphia (The English Replicas), New York, N.Y.: Payson & Clarke Ltd., 1927, OCLC 78413388, page 192:
      According to that Cabaliſticall Dogma: If Abram had not had this Letter [i.e., ה(he)] added unto his Name he had remained fruitleſſe, and without the power of generation: [] So that being ſterill before, he received the power of generation from that meaſure and manſion in the Archetype; and was made conformable unto Binah.
  2. (figuratively) Terse; lacking sentiment or emotional stimulation, as in a manner of speaking.
  3. (figuratively) Fruitless, uninspiring, or unproductive.
  4. Germless; free from all living or viable microorganisms.
    a sterile kitchen table
  5. free from dangerous objects, as a zone in an airport that can be only be entered via a security checkpoint

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

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GermanEdit

InterlinguaEdit

AdjectiveEdit

sterile (not comparable)

  1. sterile

ItalianEdit

LatinEdit

Norwegian BokmålEdit

AdjectiveEdit

sterile

  1. definite singular/plural of steril

Norwegian NynorskEdit

AdjectiveEdit

sterile

  1. definite singular/plural of steril