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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French sentement, from Latin sentimentum.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈsɛn.tɪ.mənt/
  • (file)

NounEdit

sentiment (countable and uncountable, plural sentiments)

  1. A general thought, feeling, or sense.
    • 1922, Ben Travers, chapter 5, in A Cuckoo in the Nest:
      The departure was not unduly prolonged. [] Within the door Mrs. Spoker hastily imparted to Mrs. Love a few final sentiments on the subject of Divine Intention in the disposition of buckets; farewells and last commiserations; a deep, guttural instigation to the horse; and the wheels of the waggonette crunched heavily away into obscurity.
  2. (uncountable) Feelings, especially tender feelings, as apart from reason or judgment, or of a weak or foolish kind.
    • 2014 March 3, Zoe Alderton, “‘Snapewives’ and ‘Snapeism’: A Fiction-Based Religion within the Harry Potter Fandom”, in Religions[1], volume 5, number 1, MDPI, DOI:10.3390/rel5010219, pages 219-257:
      Despite personal schisms and differences in spiritual experience, there is a very coherent theology of Snape shared between the wives. To examine this manifestation of religious fandom, I will first discuss the canon scepticism and anti-Rowling sentiment that helps to contextualise the wider belief in Snape as a character who extends beyond book and film.

TranslationsEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin sentimentum; sentir +‎ -ment.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sentiment m (plural sentiments)

  1. emotion; feeling; sentiment

Related termsEdit

See alsoEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French sentement, from Latin sentimentum.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sentiment m (plural sentiments)

  1. A sentiment, general thought, sense or feeling.
  2. An opinion.

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


OccitanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin sentimentum.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sentiment m (plural sentiments)

  1. feeling (emotion; impression)
  2. feeling, intuition
  3. sentiment, emotion

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • Joan de Cantalausa (2006) Diccionari general occitan a partir dels parlars lengadocians, 2 edition, →ISBN, page 906.

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French sentiment, Latin sentimentum. Cf. also simțământ.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sentiment n (plural sentimente)

  1. sentiment, thought, sense, feeling
    Synonyms: simțire, simțământ (dated)
  2. belief, opinion
    Synonyms: credință, opinie, convingere

DeclensionEdit