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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Afrikaans stoep, from Dutch stoep, from Middle Dutch stoep.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

stoep (plural stoeps)

  1. A raised veranda in front of a house.
    • 1926, Arthur Conan Doyle, ‘The Adventure of the Blanched Soldier’, Norton 2005, p. 1501:
      To my surprise there was a house close beside me, a fairly large house with a broad stoep and many windows.
    • 1979, André Brink, A Dry White Season, Vintage 1998, p. 89:
      On the stoep an old man was moving about on hands and knees with red polish and brushes and dirty cloths.
    • 1983, J. M. Coetzee, Life and Times of Michael K, Secker & Warburg, 1983, p. 18:
      Why should the Police want us to spend nights hiding on other people's stoeps and beg in the streets and make a nuisance of ourselves?

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AfrikaansEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Dutch stoep, from Middle Dutch stoep.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

stoep (plural stoepe)

  1. stoep, stoop, raised platform or veranda in front of a house

DescendantsEdit


DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Dutch stoep. Cognate to German Stufe. This etymology is incomplete. You can help Wiktionary by elaborating on the origins of this term.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /stup/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: stoep
  • Rhymes: -up

NounEdit

stoep f (plural stoepen, diminutive stoepje n)

  1. pavement, footpath, sidewalk
    Synonym: trottoir
  2. stoop, platform before a (major) door into a building, doorstep

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