English edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Italian stretto. Doublet of strait and strict.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

stretto (countable and uncountable, plural strettos or stretti)

  1. (music) The presence of two close or overlapping statements of the subject of a fugue, especially towards the end.
  2. (music) An acceleration in the tempo of an opera that produces an ending climax.

Adverb edit

stretto (not comparable)

  1. (music) With gradually increasing speed.

Adjective edit

stretto (not comparable)

  1. (music) Having gradually increasing speed.
    • 1960, Thomas Pynchon, Entropy:
      So that over and above the public components – holidays, tourist attractions – there are private meanderings, linked to the climate as if this spell were a stretto passage in the year’s fugue: haphazard weather, aimless loves, unpredicted commitments…

Anagrams edit

Italian edit

Etymology edit

From Latin strictus, perfect passive participle of stringō.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈstret.to/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -etto
  • Hyphenation: strét‧to

Adjective edit

stretto (feminine stretta, masculine plural stretti, feminine plural strette, superlative strettissimo)

  1. narrow
    Antonym: largo
  2. tight
  3. strict
  4. (linguistics) close

Derived terms edit

Noun edit

stretto m (plural stretti)

  1. strait

Participle edit

stretto (feminine stretta, masculine plural stretti, feminine plural strette)

  1. past participle of stringere

Related terms edit

Romanian edit

Etymology edit

Unadapted borrowing from Italian stretto.

Adverb edit

stretto

  1. stretto