EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Italian taglia (a cutting, a pulley), from tagliare (to cut). See tailor.

NounEdit

taglia (plural taglias)

  1. (engineering, obsolete) A particular system of fixed and movable pulleys; a tackle with a set of sheaves in a fixed block and another set in a movable block to which the weight is attached.

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for taglia in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)


ItalianEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From the verb tagliare (to cut). Compare French taille.

NounEdit

taglia f (plural taglie)

  1. size (of clothes, etc,.)
  2. (by extension) size or dimensions (of an animal)
  3. (archaic) dresswear
  4. a reward for catching a criminal; head money
  5. (archaic, derogatory) a heavy tax that lines the pockets of bureaucrats rather than routing that money into public services
  6. (archaic) a due (membership fee) for a militia
  7. (archaic) a heavy tribute imposed on the defeated country in a war, geopolitical dispute, etc.
  8. (archaic) bail for a prisoner of war
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

VerbEdit

taglia

  1. inflection of tagliare:
    1. third-person singular present indicative
    2. second-person singular imperative

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


RomanschEdit

EtymologyEdit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

NounEdit

taglia f (plural taglias)

  1. (anatomy, Rumantsch Grischun, Surmiran, Puter) waist

SynonymsEdit

  • (Rumantsch Grischun, Vallader) vita
  • (Sursilvan, Sutsilvan, Surmiran) veta