See also: Vita, vită, viță, vítá, Víťa, and vitæ

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin vīta (life).

NounEdit

vita (plural vitae or vitas)

  1. A hagiography; a biography of a saint.
  2. A curriculum vitae.

FaroeseEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse vita, from Proto-Germanic *witaną, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *weyd- (see).

VerbEdit

vita (third person singular past indicative visti, third person plural past indicative vistu, supine vitað)

  1. To know.
ConjugationEdit
Conjugation of vita (irregular)
infinitive vita
supine vitað
participle
present past
first singular veit visti
second singular veitst visti
third singular veit visti
plural vita vistu
imperative
singular
plural
Related termsEdit

See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Inflected form of viti

NounEdit

vita m

  1. indefinite accusative singular of viti
  2. indefinite dative singular of viti
  3. indefinite genitive singular of viti
  4. indefinite genitive plural of viti

FinnishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈʋitɑ/, [ˈʋit̪ɑ]
  • Rhymes: -itɑ
  • Syllabification: vi‧ta

NounEdit

vita

  1. pondweed (an aquatic plant of the genus Potamogeton)

DeclensionEdit

Inflection of vita (Kotus type 9*F/kala, t-d gradation)
nominative vita vidat
genitive vidan vitojen
partitive vitaa vitoja
illative vitaan vitoihin
singular plural
nominative vita vidat
accusative nom. vita vidat
gen. vidan
genitive vidan vitojen
vitainrare
partitive vitaa vitoja
inessive vidassa vidoissa
elative vidasta vidoista
illative vitaan vitoihin
adessive vidalla vidoilla
ablative vidalta vidoilta
allative vidalle vidoille
essive vitana vitoina
translative vidaksi vidoiksi
instructive vidoin
abessive vidatta vidoitta
comitative vitoineen
Possessive forms of vita (type kala)
possessor singular plural
1st person vitani vitamme
2nd person vitasi vitanne
3rd person vitansa

HypernymsEdit

HyponymsEdit

AnagramsEdit


HungarianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Back-formation from vitat.[1]

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ˈvitɒ]
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: vi‧ta
  • Rhymes: -tɒ

NounEdit

vita (plural viták)

  1. debate

DeclensionEdit

Inflection (stem in long/high vowel, back harmony)
singular plural
nominative vita viták
accusative vitát vitákat
dative vitának vitáknak
instrumental vitával vitákkal
causal-final vitáért vitákért
translative vitává vitákká
terminative vitáig vitákig
essive-formal vitaként vitákként
essive-modal
inessive vitában vitákban
superessive vitán vitákon
adessive vitánál vitáknál
illative vitába vitákba
sublative vitára vitákra
allative vitához vitákhoz
elative vitából vitákból
delative vitáról vitákról
ablative vitától vitáktól
non-attributive
possessive - singular
vitáé vitáké
non-attributive
possessive - plural
vitáéi vitákéi
Possessive forms of vita
possessor single possession multiple possessions
1st person sing. vitám vitáim
2nd person sing. vitád vitáid
3rd person sing. vitája vitái
1st person plural vitánk vitáink
2nd person plural vitátok vitáitok
3rd person plural vitájuk vitáik

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Eőry, Vilma. Értelmező szótár+ (’Explanatory Dictionary Plus’). Budapest: Tinta Könyvkiadó, 2007. →ISBN

Further readingEdit

  • vita in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh. A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (’The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962. Fifth ed., 1992: →ISBN

IcelandicEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse vita, from Proto-Germanic *witaną, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *weyd- (see).

VerbEdit

vita (preterite-present verb, third-person singular present indicative veit, third-person singular past indicative vissi, supine vitað)

  1. To know.
  2. To see, check.
    Vittu nú hvort þú getir ekki lagað þetta fyrir mig.
    Now see if you can’t fix that for me.
ConjugationEdit
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

vita

  1. inflection of viti:
    1. indefinite accusative
    2. indefinite dative singular
    3. indefinite genitive

InterlinguaEdit

NounEdit

vita (plural vitas)

  1. life

Related termsEdit


ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin vīta, from Proto-Italic *gʷītā, possibly a derivative of Proto-Indo-European *gʷih₃wo-teh₂, from the root *gʷeyh₃- (to live).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

vita f (plural vite)

  1. life
    • 1472, Dante Alighieri, La divina commedia: Inferno [The Divine Comedy: Hell] (paperback), 12th edition, Le Monnier, published 1994, Canto I, page 5:
      Nel mezzo del cammin di nostra vita
      mi ritrovai per una selva oscura,
      ché la diritta via era smarrita.
      Midway upon the journey of our life
      I found myself within a forest dark,
      for the straight-forward pathway had been lost.
  2. waist

Related termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


LadinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin vīta.

NounEdit

vita f (plural vites)

  1. life

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Italic *gʷītā. Possibly corresponds to a derivative of Proto-Indo-European *gʷih₃wo-teh₂ (compare Ancient Greek βίοτος (bíotos, life), Old Irish bethu, bethad, Irish beatha, Welsh bywyd, Old Church Slavonic животъ (životŭ, life), Lithuanian gyvatà (life), Sanskrit जीवित (jīvitá), Avestan gayo (accusative ǰyātum) "life")), ultimately from *gʷeyh₃- (to live).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

vīta f (genitive vītae); first declension

  1. life
  2. (by extension) living, support, subsistence
  3. a way of life
  4. real life, not fiction
  5. (figuratively) mankind, the living

DeclensionEdit

First-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative vīta vītae
Genitive vītae vītārum
Dative vītae vītīs
Accusative vītam vītās
Ablative vītā vītīs
Vocative vīta vītae

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

VerbEdit

vītā

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of vītō

ReferencesEdit

  • vita in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • vita in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • vita in Geir T. Zoëga (1910) A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • vita in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)

MalagasyEdit

AdjectiveEdit

vita

  1. finished, complete, completed
  2. (figuratively) dead

VerbEdit

vita

  1. To finish, complete, do, accomplish.

Related termsEdit

Focus (Voice)
Agent
(Active)
man-form: mamita
mi-form: --
om-form: --
Patient
(Passive)
vitaina
alternate: --
a-form: --
voa-form: --
tafa-form: --
Goal
(Relative)
an-form: amitana
i-form: --

See alsoEdit


NeapolitanEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin vīta. Compare Italian vita.

NounEdit

vita f (plural vite)

  1. life

Norwegian NynorskEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse vita, from Proto-Germanic *witaną, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *weyd- (see).

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

vita (present tense veit, past tense visste, past participle visst, passive infinitive vitast, present participle vitande, imperative vit)

  1. To know, the story of someone's life.
    Veit du kva dette er?
    Do you know what this is?
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Latin vita (life).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

vita n (definite singular vitaet, indefinite plural vita, definite plural vitaa)

  1. biography
    Synonym: biografi

Etymology 3Edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

vita n

  1. definite plural of vit

ReferencesEdit


Old NorseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *witaną (to know), from Proto-Indo-European *wóyde (to have seen, know), originally a perfect form of *weyd- (to see). Cognate with Old English witan, Old Frisian wita, Old Saxon witan, Old Dutch witan, Old High German wizzan, Gothic 𐍅𐌹𐍄𐌰𐌽 (witan).

VerbEdit

vita (singular past indicative vissi, plural past indicative vissu, past participle vitaðr)

  1. to know
ConjugationEdit
DescendantsEdit

Old SwedishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse vita, from Proto-Germanic *witaną.

VerbEdit

vita

  1. To know.
ConjugationEdit
DescendantsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Norse víta, from Proto-Germanic *wītaną.

VerbEdit

vīta

  1. To prove.
  2. To accuse.
ConjugationEdit

PiedmonteseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin vīta, from Proto-Italic *gʷītā, possibly a derivative of Proto-Indo-European *gʷih₃wo-teh₂, from the root *gʷeyh₃- (to live).

NounEdit

vita f (plural vite)

  1. life

RomanschEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin vīta.

NounEdit

vita f (plural vitas)

  1. (Rumantsch Grischun, Puter, Vallader) life
Alternative formsEdit
  • veta (Sursilvan, Sutsilvan, Surmiran)

Etymology 2Edit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

NounEdit

vita f (plural vitas)

  1. (anatomy, Rumantsch Grischun, Vallader) waist
Alternative formsEdit
  • veta (Sursilvan, Sutsilvan, Surmiran)
SynonymsEdit
  • taglia (Rumantsch Grischun, Surmiran, Puter)

Serbo-CroatianEdit

ParticipleEdit

vita (Cyrillic spelling вита)

  1. inflection of viti:
    1. feminine singular passive past participle
    2. neuter plural passive past participle

SwahiliEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

vita

  1. plural of kita: war

SwedishEdit

AdjectiveEdit

vita

  1. absolute singular definite and plural form of vit.

TsongaEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Bantu *-bɪ́dia, causative form of Proto-Bantu *-bɪ́da.

VerbEdit

vita

  1. To call.