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See also: Vita, vită, Víťa, and viță

Contents

EnglishEdit

NounEdit

vita (plural vitae or vitas)

  1. A curriculum vitae.

FaroeseEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse vita, from Proto-Germanic *witaną, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *weyd- (see).

VerbEdit

vita (third person singular past indicative visti, third person plural past indicative vistu, supine vitað)

  1. to know
ConjugationEdit
Related termsEdit

See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Inflected form of viti

NounEdit

vita m

  1. indefinite accusative singular of viti
  2. indefinite dative singular of viti
  3. indefinite genitive singular of viti
  4. indefinite genitive plural of viti

FinnishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈʋitɑ/, [ˈʋit̪ɑ]
  • Hyphenation: vi‧ta

NounEdit

vita

  1. pondweed (aquatic plant of the genus Potamogeton)

DeclensionEdit

Inflection of vita (Kotus type 9/kala, t-d gradation)
nominative vita vidat
genitive vidan vitojen
partitive vitaa vitoja
illative vitaan vitoihin
singular plural
nominative vita vidat
accusative nom. vita vidat
gen. vidan
genitive vidan vitojen
vitainrare
partitive vitaa vitoja
inessive vidassa vidoissa
elative vidasta vidoista
illative vitaan vitoihin
adessive vidalla vidoilla
ablative vidalta vidoilta
allative vidalle vidoille
essive vitana vitoina
translative vidaksi vidoiksi
instructive vidoin
abessive vidatta vidoitta
comitative vitoineen

HypernymsEdit

HyponymsEdit

AnagramsEdit


HungarianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Back-formation from vitat.[1]

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ˈvitɒ]
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: vi‧ta

NounEdit

vita (plural viták)

  1. debate

DeclensionEdit

Inflection (stem in long/high vowel, back harmony)
singular plural
nominative vita viták
accusative vitát vitákat
dative vitának vitáknak
instrumental vitával vitákkal
causal-final vitáért vitákért
translative vitává vitákká
terminative vitáig vitákig
essive-formal vitaként vitákként
essive-modal
inessive vitában vitákban
superessive vitán vitákon
adessive vitánál vitáknál
illative vitába vitákba
sublative vitára vitákra
allative vitához vitákhoz
elative vitából vitákból
delative vitáról vitákról
ablative vitától vitáktól
Possessive forms of vita
possessor single possession multiple possessions
1st person sing. vitám vitáim
2nd person sing. vitád vitáid
3rd person sing. vitája vitái
1st person plural vitánk vitáink
2nd person plural vitátok vitáitok
3rd person plural vitájuk vitáik

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Eőry, Vilma. Értelmező szótár+ (’Explanatory Dictionary Plus’). Budapest: Tinta Könyvkiadó, 2007. →ISBN

IcelandicEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse vita, from Proto-Germanic *witaną, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *weyd- (see).

VerbEdit

vita (preterite-present verb, third-person singular present indicative veit, third-person singular past indicative vissi, supine vitað)

  1. to know
  2. to see, check
    Vittu nú hvort þú getir ekki lagað þetta fyrir mig.
    Now see if you can’t fix that for me.
ConjugationEdit
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

vita

  1. indefinite accusative singular of viti
  2. indefinite dative singular of viti
  3. indefinite genitive singular of viti
  4. indefinite accusative plural of viti
  5. indefinite genitive plural of viti

InterlinguaEdit

NounEdit

vita (plural vitas)

  1. life

Related termsEdit


ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin vīta, from Proto-Italic *gʷītā, possibly a derivative of Proto-Indo-European *gʷih₃wo-teh₂, from the root *gʷeyh₃- (to live).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈvi.ta/, [ˈviːt̪ä]
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: vì‧ta

NounEdit

vita f (plural vite)

  1. life
    • 1472, Dante Alighieri, La divina commedia: Inferno [The Divine Comedy: Hell] (paperback), 12th edition, Le Monnier, published 1994, Canto I, page 5:
      Nel mezzo del cammin di nostra vita ¶ mi ritrovai per una selva oscura, ¶ ché la diritta via era smarrita.
      Midway upon the journey of our life ¶ I found myself within a forest dark, ¶ for the straight-forward pathway had been lost.
  2. waist

Related termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


LadinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin vīta.

NounEdit

vita f (plural vites)

  1. life

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Italic *gʷītā. Possibly corresponds to a derivative of Proto-Indo-European *gʷih₃wo-teh₂ (compare Ancient Greek βίοτος (bíotos, life), Old Irish bethu, bethad, Irish beatha, Welsh bywyd, Old Church Slavonic животъ (životŭ, life), Lithuanian gyvatà (life), Sanskrit जीवित (jīvitá), Avestan gayo (accusative ǰyātum) "life")), ultimately from *gʷeyh₃- (to live).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

vīta f (genitive vītae); first declension

  1. life
  2. (by extension) living, support, subsistence
  3. a way of life
  4. real life, not fiction
  5. (figuratively) mankind, the living

DeclensionEdit

First-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative vīta vītae
Genitive vītae vītārum
Dative vītae vītīs
Accusative vītam vītās
Ablative vītā vītīs
Vocative vīta vītae

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

VerbEdit

vītā

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of vītō

ReferencesEdit

  • vita in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • vita in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • vita in Geir T. Zoëga (1910) A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • vita in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to live a happy (unhappy) life: vitam beatam (miseram) degere
    • to live (all) one's life (honourably, in the country, as a man of learning): vitam, aetatem (omnem aetatem, omne aetatis tempus) agere (honeste, ruri, in litteris), degere, traducere
    • the rest of one's life: quod reliquum est vitae
    • to finish one's career: vitae cursum or curriculum conficere
    • to reach one's hundredth year, to live to be a hundred: vitam ad annum centesimum perducere
    • to starve oneself to death: inediā mori or vitam finire
    • on one's last day: supremo vitae die
    • to give up the ghost: extremum vitae spiritum edere
    • to put an end to one's life: vitae finem facere
    • such was the end of... (used of a violent death): talem vitae exitum (not finem) habuit (Nep. Eum. 13)
    • to sacrifice oneself for one's country: vitam profundere pro patria
    • power over life and death: potestas vitae necisque
    • to be in peril of one's life: in vitae discrimine versari
    • to risk one's life: salutem, vitam suam in discrimen offerre (not exponere)
    • to recklessly hazard one's life: in periculum capitis, in discrimen vitae se inferre
    • to earn a precarious livelihood: vitam inopem sustentare, tolerare
    • to live in poverty, destitution: vitam in egestate degere
    • to sully one's fair fame: vitae splendori(em) maculas(is) aspergere
    • to injure a man's character, tarnish his honour: notam turpitudinis alicui or vitae alicuius inurere
    • we know from experience: usu rerum (vitae, vitae communis) edocti sumus
    • to choose a career, profession: genus vitae (vivendi) or aetatis degendae deligere
    • to enter upon a career: viam vitae ingredi (Flacc. 42. 105)
    • a lifelike picture of everyday life: morum ac vitae imitatio
    • to give an account of a man's life: vitam alicuius exponere
    • to make a sketch of a man's life: vitam alicuius depingere
    • a good conscience: conscientia recta, recte facti (factorum), virtutis, bene actae vitae, rectae voluntatis
    • a sound and sensible system of conduct: vitae ratio bene ac sapienter instituta
    • the principles which I have followed since I came to man's estate: meae vitae rationes ab ineunte aetate susceptae (Imp. Pomp. 1. 1.)
    • the necessaries of life: res ad vitam necessariae
    • comfor: vitae commoditas iucunditasque
    • to provide some one with a livelihood: omnes ad vitam copias suppeditare alicui
    • to endure a life of privation: vitam (inopem) tolerare (B. G. 7. 77)
    • social life: vitae societas
    • to unite isolated individuals into a society: dissipatos homines in (ad) societatem vitae convocare (Tusc. 1. 25. 62)
    • to live a lonely life: vitam solitariam agere
    • he has power over life and death: potestatem habet in aliquem vitae necisque (B. G. 1. 16. 5)
    • (ambiguous) country life (the life of resident farmers, etc.: vita rustica
    • (ambiguous) country life (of casual, temporary visitors): rusticatio, vita rusticana
    • (ambiguous) to be alive: in vita esse
    • (ambiguous) to enjoy the privilege of living; to be alive: vita or hac luce frui
    • (ambiguous) as long as I live: dum vita suppetit; dum (quoad) vivo
    • (ambiguous) if I live till then: si vita mihi suppeditat
    • (ambiguous) if I live till then: si vita suppetit
    • (ambiguous) the evening of life: vita occidens
    • (ambiguous) to depart this life: (de) vita decedere or merely decedere
    • (ambiguous) to depart this life: (ex) vita excedere, ex vita abire
    • (ambiguous) to depart this life: de vita exire, de (ex) vita migrare
    • (ambiguous) to take one's own life: se vita privare
    • (ambiguous) that is the way of the world; such is life: sic vita hominum est
    • (ambiguous) happiness, bliss: beata vita, beate vivere, beatum esse
    • (ambiguous) to live a life free from all misfortune: nihil calamitatis (in vita) videre
    • (ambiguous) a man's life is at stake, is in very great danger: salus, caput, vita alicuius agitur, periclitatur, in discrimine est or versatur
    • (ambiguous) the contemplative life of a student: vita umbratilis (vid. sect. VII. 4)
    • (ambiguous) to have attained to a high degree of culture: omni vita atque victu excultum atque expolitum esse (Brut. 25. 95)
    • (ambiguous) to civilise men, a nation: homines, gentem a fera agrestique vita ad humanum cultum civilemque deducere (De Or. 1. 8. 33)
    • (ambiguous) moral science; ethics: philosophia, quae est de vita et moribus (Acad. 1. 5. 19)
    • (ambiguous) moral science; ethics: philosophia, in qua de bonis rebus et malis, deque hominum vita et moribus disputatur
    • (ambiguous) a thing is taken from life: aliquid e vita ductum est
    • (ambiguous) a virtuous (immoral) life: vita honesta (turpis)
    • (ambiguous) a life defiled by every crime: vita omnibus flagitiis, vitiis dedita
    • (ambiguous) a life defiled by every crime: vita omnibus flagitiis inquinata
    • (ambiguous) character: natura et mores; vita moresque; indoles animi ingeniique; or simply ingenium, indoles, natura, mores
    • (ambiguous) the busy life of a statesman: vita occupata (vid. sect. VII. 2)
    • (ambiguous) private life: vita privata (Senect. 7. 22)

MalagasyEdit

AdjectiveEdit

vita

  1. finished, complete, completed
  2. (figuratively) dead

VerbEdit

vita

  1. to finish, complete, do, accomplish

Related termsEdit

Focus (Voice)
Agent
(Active)
man-form: mamita
mi-form: --
om-form: --
Patient
(Passive)
vitaina
alternate: --
a-form: --
voa-form: --
tafa-form: --
Goal
(Relative)
an-form: amitana
i-form: --

See alsoEdit


NeapolitanEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin vīta. Compare Italian vita.

NounEdit

vita f (plural vite)

  1. life

Norwegian NynorskEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse vita, from Proto-Germanic *witaną, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *weyd- (see).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

vita (present tense veit, past tense visste, past participle visst, passive infinitive vitast, present participle vitande, imperative vit)

  1. know
    Veit du kva dette er?
    Do you know what this is?

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Old NorseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *witaną (to know), from Proto-Indo-European *wóyde (to have seen, know), originally a perfect form of *weyd- (to see). Cognate with Old English witan, Old Frisian wita, Old Saxon witan, Old Dutch witan, Old High German wizzan, Gothic 𐍅𐌹𐍄𐌰𐌽 (witan).

VerbEdit

vita (singular past indicative vissi, plural past indicative vissu, past participle vitaðr)

  1. to know

ConjugationEdit

DescendantsEdit


Old SwedishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse vita, from Proto-Germanic *witaną.

VerbEdit

vita

  1. to know
ConjugationEdit
DescendantsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Norse víta, from Proto-Germanic *wītaną.

VerbEdit

vīta

  1. to prove
  2. to accuse
ConjugationEdit

PiedmonteseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin vīta, from Proto-Italic *gʷītā, possibly a derivative of Proto-Indo-European *gʷih₃wo-teh₂, from the root *gʷeyh₃- (to live).

NounEdit

vita f (plural vite)

  1. life

RomanschEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin vīta.

NounEdit

vita f (plural vitas)

  1. (Rumantsch Grischun, Puter, Vallader) life
Alternative formsEdit
  • (Sursilvan, Sutsilvan, Surmiran) veta

Etymology 2Edit

You can help Wiktionary by providing a proper etymology.

NounEdit

vita f (plural vitas)

  1. (anatomy, Rumantsch Grischun, Vallader) waist
Alternative formsEdit
  • (Sursilvan, Sutsilvan, Surmiran) veta
SynonymsEdit
  • (Rumantsch Grischun, Surmiran, Puter) taglia

SwahiliEdit

NounEdit

vita (n class, plural vita)

  1. war

SwedishEdit

AdjectiveEdit

vita

  1. absolute singular definite and plural form of vit.