English

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Etymology

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From Latin tālea. Doublet of taille and tally.

Noun

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talea (plural taleae)

  1. (music) A repeated rhythmic pattern used in isorhythm.

Italian

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Etymology

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From Latin tālea (cutting; scion).

Noun

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talea f (plural talee)

  1. cutting, scion
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Anagrams

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Latin

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Etymology

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Of unclear origin. Traditionally derived from Proto-Indo-European *teh₂l- (to grow; young animal) and compared with Ancient Greek τᾶλῐς (tâlis, maiden, bride), but the existence of this root, as well as the cognacy of the Greek term, has been called into question. The only other viable etymology that has been described in the literature considers the term as a derivative of tālus (ankle, knuckle).[1]

Pronunciation

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Noun

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tālea f (genitive tāleae); first declension

  1. A long or slender piece of wood or metal; rod, stick, stake, bar.
  2. A cutting, set or layer for planting.
  3. (by extension) A scion, twig, sprig.

Declension

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First-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative tālea tāleae
Genitive tāleae tāleārum
Dative tāleae tāleīs
Accusative tāleam tāleās
Ablative tāleā tāleīs
Vocative tālea tāleae

Synonyms

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Derived terms

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Descendants

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References

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  • talea”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • talea”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • talea in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • talea in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette.
  1. ^ De Vaan, Michiel (2008) Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 7), Leiden, Boston: Brill, →ISBN, page 605