Last modified on 14 April 2015, at 22:19

virga

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin virga (rod).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

virga (countable and uncountable, plural virgae)

  1. (music, uncountable) A type of note used in plainsong notation, having a tail.
  2. (meteorology, countable) A streak of rain or snow that is dissipated in falling and does not reach the ground, commonly appearing descending from a cloud layer.

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit


CatalanEdit

NounEdit

virga f (plural virgues)

  1. (meteorology) virga

EsperantoEdit

AdjectiveEdit

virga (accusative singular virgan, plural virgaj, accusative plural virgajn)

  1. virginal

EstonianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

virga

  1. Genitive singular form of virk.

IstriotEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin virga.

NounEdit

virga f

  1. whip
  2. strap

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

Probably from Proto-Indo-European *wisgā (flexible rod or stick). Possibly cognate to Old Norse visk and Old High German wisc (bundle, sheaf).[1]

PronunciationEdit

Pronunciation 1Edit

NounEdit

virga f (genitive virgae); first declension

  1. twig, switch
  2. rod, switch for flogging.
  3. staff, walking stick
  4. wand (magical)
  5. (figuratively, vulgar) penis

virga f

  1. vocative singular of virga
InflectionEdit

First declension.

Number Singular Plural
nominative virga virgae
genitive virgae virgārum
dative virgae virgīs
accusative virgam virgās
ablative virgā virgīs
vocative virga virgae
Derived termsEdit
DescendantsEdit

Pronunciation 2Edit

NounEdit

virgā f

  1. ablative singular of virga

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ “verga” in: Alberto Nocentini, Alessandro Parenti, “l'Etimologico — Vocabolario della lingua italiana”, Le Monnier, 2010, ISBN 978-88-00-20781-2
  • virga” in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short, A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1879.