tangible

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Middle French tangible, from Late Latin tangibilis, from Latin tangere (to touch).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

tangible (comparative more tangible, superlative most tangible)

  1. Touchable; able to be touched or felt; perceptible by the sense of touch
    Synonyms: palpable; see also Thesaurus:tactile
  2. Possible to be treated as fact; real or concrete.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:substantial
    • 2021 May 15, Phil McNulty, “Chelsea 0-1 Leicester”, in BBC Sport[1]:
      And for Rodgers, who cleaned up with Celtic in Scotland, this was another significant addition to his CV, as his expert guidance of Leicester - who are in a strong position to finish in the Premier League's top four and face Chelsea again at Stamford Bridge on Tuesday - now has a tangible reward in the shape of the FA Cup.
  3. Comprehensible by the mind; understandable.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:comprehensible

AntonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

NounEdit

tangible (plural tangibles)

  1. A physical object, something that can be touched.
  2. Real or concrete results.
    Yes, but what are the tangibles?

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Late Latin tangibilis, from Latin tango.

AdjectiveEdit

tangible (masculine and feminine plural tangibles)

  1. tangible

AntonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Late Latin tangibilis, from Latin tango.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

tangible (plural tangibles)

  1. tangible

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Late Latin tangibilis, from Latin tango.

AdjectiveEdit

tangible (plural tangibles)

  1. tangible
    Antonym: intangible

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit