Open main menu

Contents

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

testing (comparative more testing, superlative most testing)

  1. difficult, tough
    • 2011 June 4, Phil McNulty, “England 2 - 2 Switzerland”, in BBC[1]:
      England have now gone four games without a win at Wembley, their longest sequence without a victory in 30 years, and still have much work to do to reach Euro 2012 as they prepare for a testing trip to face Bulgaria in Sofia in September.

NounEdit

testing (countable and uncountable, plural testings)

  1. The act of conducting a test; trialing, proving.
    • 2011, Emerson B. Powery, Immersion Bible Studies: Luke
      The wilderness testings of Jesus prepare him for ministry in which such temptations and shortcuts will recur.

HyponymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

VerbEdit

testing

  1. present participle of test

AnagramsEdit


CebuanoEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English testing, present participle of test, from Middle English test, teste, borrowed from Old French test, teste (an earthen vessel, especially a pot in which metals were tried), from Latin testum (the lid of an earthen vessel, an earthen vessel, an earthen pot), from *terstus, past participle of the root *tersa (dry land).

PronunciationEdit

  • Hyphenation: tes‧ting

VerbEdit

testing

  1. to test someone or something

NounEdit

testing

  1. a testing; the act of conducting a test

QuotationsEdit

For quotations of use of this term, see Citations:testing.