See also: Thema and þema

EnglishEdit

NounEdit

thema (plural themas or themata)

  1. A subject or theme.
    • 1997, Rocco Caopzzi, Reading Eco: An Anthology, page 111:
      Eco has his own image for this method-spiral repetition: every new exploration elevates the solutions to a higher level by expanding the thema's cognitive context.
    • 2013, Siegfried Wenzel, The Art of Preaching, page 151:
      With regard to its division—which is the second main section [of this treatise]—one must diligently examine the meaning of the words that appear in the thema.

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin thema, from Ancient Greek θέμα (théma).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈteː.maː/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: the‧ma
  • Rhymes: -eːmaː

NounEdit

thema n (plural thema's or themata, diminutive themaatje n)

  1. topic, subject, issue
  2. (music) theme

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Indonesian: tema

InterlinguaEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

thema (plural themas)

  1. subject (e.g., of conversation)

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Ancient Greek θέμα (théma).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

thema n (genitive thematis); third declension

  1. theme, topic
  2. the alignment of celestial bodies at a person's birth, horoscope

DeclensionEdit

Third-declension noun (neuter, imparisyllabic non-i-stem).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative thema themata
Genitive thematis thematum
Dative thematī thematibus
Accusative thema themata
Ablative themate thematibus
Vocative thema themata

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • thema”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • thema in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • thema in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette

PortugueseEdit

NounEdit

thema m (plural themas)

  1. Obsolete spelling of tema (used in Portugal until September 1911 and in Brazil until the 1940s).