Open main menu

Contents

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English tofore, toforn, from Old English tōforan (in front of), from (to) + foran (front, fore-part, n.), dative case of fora (front). Compare Dutch tevoren (previously), German zuvor (before, previously). More at to, fore.

PrepositionEdit

tofore

  1. (obsolete) Before.

AdverbEdit

tofore (not comparable)

  1. (obsolete) Before.
    • 1592, William Shakespeare, Titus Andronicus:
      Farewell, Lavinia, my noble sister ; O would thou wert as thou tofore hast been!

ConjunctionEdit

tofore

  1. (obsolete) Before.

AnagramsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old English tōforan; equivalent to to- +‎ fore.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /toːˈfɔːr(ə)/, /toːˈfɔːr(ə)n/, /tɔ-/, /tə-/

AdverbEdit

tofore

  1. In front, ahead; in the first position in a sequence.
  2. At a prior time; beforehand, earlier.
  3. (in texts) Found above; found in a prior section.

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

PrepositionEdit

tofore

  1. In front of.
  2. Closer than something (with reference to the speaker).
  3. In the presence of; before.
  4. Earlier than; prior to.
  5. To a degree greater than; moreso than.

ReferencesEdit

DescendantsEdit

ConjunctionEdit

tofore

  1. Indicates that the antecedent clause occurred before the consequent clause in time.
    • Sir Thomas Malory
      Never sith myght he be heled, ne nought shal tofore we come to hym.

Usage notesEdit

  • As a conjunction, tofore is often paired with þat.

ReferencesEdit