EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From tropical +‎ -o (diminutive suffix). First used by Australian troops in tropical regions during WWII, in the sense “affected by war service in the tropics.” [1][2]

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈtɹɒpəʊ/
  • (file)

AdjectiveEdit

troppo (not comparable)

  1. (Australia, slang, with go) Crazy, mad, strangely behaving; especially as attributed to hot weather.
    Barry′s gone troppo and married that sheila he′s only known for two weeks.
    After three months by himself on his ‘dream’ tropical island he went troppo and smashed all the equipment.
    • 1989, Rosie Boycott, All for Love, page 163,
      [] She calls these rehearsals my singing lessons - but at least I don′t have people rushing in thinking I′ve gone troppo . . .’
      ‘Except me.’ Violet′s smile lingered as she gazed at him.
    • 2009, Paul Tapp, Disquiet - the Justifiable Homicide of an Australian Vietnam Veteran, page 121,
      For a lone Digger gone troppo, as Joe is deemed to have done, it is a realistic scenario.
    • 2016 March 15, David Dale, “John Jarratt talks new show Territory Cops and a murderous return in Wolf Creek”, in The Sydney Morning Herald[1]:
      "[The Northern Territory has] got the same sort of flavour to it, probably a bit more frontier. Overall, it's the tropics and they go troppo. The beer's cold and the weather's hot and they drink too much.

Usage notesEdit

Used in the verb go troppo — to go crazy, to act strangely, as due to tropical heat.

SynonymsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ 1978, G.A.Wilkes, A Dictionary of Australian Colloquialisms, Fontana.
  2. ^ Australian National Dictionary Centre Home » Australian words » Meanings and origins of Australian words and idioms » T

InterlinguaEdit

EtymologyEdit

From the Italian, and also from French trop.

AdverbEdit

troppo (not comparable)

  1. too much

ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Vulgar Latin *troppus, from Late Latin troppus, borrowed from Frankish *þorp (a cluster, agglomeration", also "collection of houses, village), from Proto-Germanic *þurpą (village), from Proto-Indo-European *trab-, *treb- (dwelling, room). Cognate with French trop (too much), Piedmontese tròp/trop. More at trop, thorp and troop.

PronunciationEdit

DeterminerEdit

troppo (feminine troppa, masculine plural troppi, feminine plural troppe)

  1. too much
    non mettere troppa carne al fuoco
    Don't bite off more than you can chew.
    (literally, “Don't put in too much meat to the fire.”)
  2. too many

PronounEdit

troppo

  1. too much, too many

AdverbEdit

troppo

  1. too much, too long, too far
    allegro ma non troppocheerful but not too much