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EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

PronunciationEdit

  • enPR: ko͝ok'i, IPA(key): /ˈkʊki/
  • (sometimes in Northern England) enPR: ko͞ok'i, IPA(key): /ˈkuːki/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ʊki

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from Dutch koekje (possibly through dialectal variation koekie), diminutive of koek (cake), from Proto-Germanic *kōkô (compare Low German Low German Kook, German German Kuchen). More at cake. Not related to cook.

Alternative formsEdit

 
Chocolate-chip cookies (both US and UK).
 
Soft cookies (both US and UK) which do not have chips, fruit or nuts in them.
 
Layered chocolate cookies (US only).

NounEdit

cookie (plural cookies)

  1. (Canada, US) a small, flat, baked good which is either crisp or soft but firm
    Synonyms: biscuit, bickie (UK, Australia)
  2. (Britain) a sweet baked good (as in the previous sense) which (usually) has chocolate chips, fruit, nuts, etc. baked into it
  3. (Scotland) a bun
  4. (computing, Internet) an HTTP cookie, web cookie
  5. (computing) a magic cookie
  6. (dated, possibly offensive) a young, attractive woman
  7. (slang, vulgar) the female genitalia
    • 2009, T. R. Oulds, Story of Many Secret Night, Lulu.com (2010), →ISBN, unnumbered page:
      Her legs hung over the edge and the large towel covered just enough of her lap to hide her 'cookie'.
    • 2010, Lennie Ross, Blow me, Lulu.com (2010), →ISBN, page 47:
      If she wanted to compete in this dog-eat-pussy world, she had to keep up her personal grooming, even if it meant spreading her legs and letting some Vietnamese woman rip the hair off her cookie every other week.
    • 2014, Nicki Minaj, "Anaconda" (Clean Version), The Pinkprint:
      Cookie put his butt to sleep, now he callin' me Nyquil.
  8. (slang, drugs) A piece of crack cocaine, larger than a rock, and oftentimes in the shape of a cookie.
Usage notesEdit
  • In North America, a biscuit is a small, soft baked bread similar to a scone but not sweet. In the United Kingdom, a biscuit is a small, crisp or firm, sweet baked good — the sort of thing which in North America is called a cookie. (Less frequently, British speakers refer to crackers as biscuits.) In North America, even small, layered baked sweets like Oreos are referred to as cookies, while in the UK, only those biscuits which have chocolate chips, nuts, fruit, or other things baked into them are also called cookies.
  • Throughout the English-speaking world, thin, crispy, salty or savoury baked breads like these are called crackers, while thin, crispy, sweet baked goods like these and these are wafers.
  • Both the US and the UK distinguish crackers, wafers and cookies/biscuits from cakes: the former are generally hard or crisp and become soft when stale, while the latter is generally soft or moist and becomes hard when stale.
HyponymsEdit
gastronomy: Hyponyms of cookie (noun)
computing, Internet: Hyponyms of cookie (noun)
Derived termsEdit
DescendantsEdit
Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

cookie (third-person singular simple present cookies, present participle cookieing, simple past and past participle cookied)

  1. (computing, transitive) To send a cookie to (a user, computer, etc.).

See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From cook +‎ -ie.

NounEdit

cookie (plural cookies)

  1. (dated, colloquial) Affectionate name for a cook.
    • 1954, Blackwood's Magazine (volumes 275-276, page 340)
      More than a little apprehensive myself, I went out to the kitchen. Cookie, deep in a murder story, rocked peacefully beside the glowing range.
    • 1988, Roald Dahl, Matilda
      "You must show cookie here how grateful you are for all the trouble she's taken."
      The boy didn't move.
      "Go on, get on with it," the Trunchbull said. "Cut a slice and taste it. We haven't got all day."

Etymology 3Edit

Corruption of cucoloris.

NounEdit

cookie (plural cookies)

  1. (slang) a cucoloris

CatalanEdit

NounEdit

cookie m (plural cookies)

  1. (computing) cookie

DutchEdit

 
Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nl

EtymologyEdit

From English cookie, in turn from Dutch koekje.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cookie n (plural cookies, diminutive cookietje n)

  1. (computing) cookie

FrenchEdit

 
French Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia fr

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English cookie.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cookie m (plural cookies)

  1. (France) cookie (American-style biscuit)
  2. (computing) cookie

PolishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English cookie.

NounEdit

cookie n (plural cookies)

  1. cookie, a packet of information sent by a server to browser

SynonymsEdit


PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English cookie.

NounEdit

cookie m (plural cookies)

  1. (Internet) cookie (data sent from a website and stored in a user's web browser while the user is browsing that website)
  2. an American-style cookie (small, flat baked good)

SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English cookie.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cookie m (plural cookies)

  1. (Internet) cookie, HTTP cookie