EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English undern, ondern, from Old English undern (third hour of the day; nine o'clock; morning), from Proto-Germanic *undurniz (interval), from Proto-Indo-European *h₁n̥ter, *h₁enter (between). Cognate with dialectal Dutch onder, dialectal German Untern, dialectal Swedish undarn.

NounEdit

undern (uncountable)

  1. (obsolete) Synonym of terce: the third hour of daylight (about 9 am). [10th-15thc.]
  2. (obsolete) Synonym of noon: the sixth hour of daylight (12 pm). [14th-15thc.]
  3. (Britain dialect) Synonym of afternoon. [15thc.]
  4. (Britain dialect) Synonym of evening. [15thc.]
  5. (Britain dialect) A light meal, particularly in the afternoon. [17thc.]

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • "undern, n.", in the Oxford English Dictionary, Oxford: Oxford University Press.

AnagramsEdit


Old EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *undurniz (interval), from Proto-Indo-European *h₁n̥ter, *h₁enter (between). Influenced in sense by Latin tertia. Cognate with Old Norse undorn.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈun.dern/, [ˈun.derˠn]

NounEdit

undern m

  1. terce, the third hour of the day (around 9 am)
  2. (in some later use) midday, the sixth hour of the day (12 pm)
  3. (in compounds) morning generally

SynonymsEdit

HypernymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Middle English: ondern, undern

ReferencesEdit