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See also: vím

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Possibly from Latin vim, accusative of vis (power, energy) (compare English vis); perhaps a modern expressive formation.[1]

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

vim (countable and uncountable, plural vims)

  1. Ready vitality and vigor. [from mid 19th c.]
    • 1999, Neil Gaiman, Stardust, p. 58 (2001 Perennial paperback edition)
      But the youth of today were a pasty lot, with none of the get-up-and-go, none of the vigor and vim that he remembered from the days when he was young…
    • 1913, Elizabeth Kimball Kendall, A Wayfarer in China
      Even this remote corner of China shows the influence of the new movement, and Western ideas are making their way. Something had been done to improve the city schools, and I can testify to the desire of the military force stationed at Ning-yüan to form itself on European models, for the morning's sleep was broken by the vigorous bugle practice of the band, and at every turn one met soldiers, marching along with a good deal of vim.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ vim” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary, 2001–2017.

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

LojbanEdit

RafsiEdit

vim

  1. rafsi of vikmi.

Norwegian NynorskEdit

VerbEdit

vim

  1. imperative of vima

PortugueseEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

vim

  1. First-person singular (eu) preterite indicative of vir
  2. (Brazil, proscribed) Alternative form of vir when used with auxiliary verbs