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EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English willy, willi, equivalent to will +‎ -y. Cognate with Dutch willig (obedient, hearsome), German willig (willing), Swedish villig (willing, agreeable).

AdjectiveEdit

willy (comparative willier or more willy, superlative williest or most willy)

  1. (obsolete) Willing; favourable; ready; eager.
  2. (Britain dialectal, Scotland) Self-willed; willful.
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English wilȝe, from Old English wiliġ (willow). More at willow.

NounEdit

willy (plural willies)

  1. Alternative form of willow

Etymology 3Edit

From Middle English wilie, from Old English wiliġe, wileġe (basket), from Proto-Germanic *wiligō (wicker basket), from Proto-Indo-European *weliko- (willow-tree). More at weel, willow.

NounEdit

willy (plural willies)

  1. (Britain dialectal) A willow basket.
  2. (Britain dialectal) A fish basket.

Etymology 4Edit

  • Possibly a contraction of Latin membrum virile, male member (that is, the penis), a Latin term used in English in the nineteenth century; also possibly the simple use of a proper name as a pet name; compare dick, fanny and peter.

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

willy (plural willies)

  1. (hypocoristic, slang, childish) the penis.
  2. (Britain) a person whom the speaker dislikes.
SynonymsEdit
TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit