Last modified on 9 September 2014, at 07:29

yark

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English ȝarken, ȝerken, from Old English ġearcian (to prepare, make ready, procure, furnish, supply), from Proto-Germanic *garwakōną (to prepare), from Proto-Indo-European *gʰrebʰ-, *gʰerbʰ- (to grab, take, rake), equivalent to yare +‎ -k. Related to Old English ġearc (ready, active, quick), Old English ġearu (prepared, ready, equipped, complete, finished, yare). More at yare.

VerbEdit

yark (third-person singular simple present yarks, present participle yarking, simple past and past participle yarked)

  1. (transitive, UK dialectal) To make ready; prepare.
    • 1881, Walter Gregor, Notes on the Folk-Lore of the North-East of Scotland:
      [...] Yet thou hast given us leather to yark, and leather to bark, [...]
  2. (transitive, obsolete) To dispose; be set in order for; be destined or intended for.
  3. (transitive, obsolete) To set open; open.
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Origin uncertain, probably originally imitative; compare jerk etc.

Alternative formsEdit

VerbEdit

yark (third-person singular simple present yarks, present participle yarking, simple past and past participle yarked)

  1. To draw (stitches etc.) tight.
  2. To hit, strike, especially with a cane or whip.
  3. To crack (a whip).

AnagramsEdit