EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English ȝarken, ȝerken, from Old English ġearcian (to prepare, make ready, procure, furnish, supply), from Proto-Germanic *garwakōną (to prepare), from Proto-Indo-European *gʰrebʰ- (to grab, take, rake), equivalent to yare +‎ -k. Related to Old English ġearc (ready, active, quick), ġearu (prepared, ready, equipped, complete, finished, yare). More at yare.

VerbEdit

yark (third-person singular simple present yarks, present participle yarking, simple past and past participle yarked)

  1. (transitive, Britain dialectal) To make ready; prepare.
    • 1881, Walter Gregor, Notes on the Folk-Lore of the North-East of Scotland:
      [...] Yet thou hast given us leather to yark, and leather to bark, [...]
  2. (transitive, obsolete) To dispose; be set in order for; be destined or intended for.
  3. (transitive, obsolete) To set open; open.
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Origin uncertain, probably originally imitative; compare jerk etc.

Alternative formsEdit

VerbEdit

yark (third-person singular simple present yarks, present participle yarking, simple past and past participle yarked)

  1. To draw (stitches etc.) tight.
  2. To hit, strike, especially with a cane or whip.
  3. To crack (a whip).

AnagramsEdit


YolaEdit

EtymologyEdit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

NounEdit

yark

  1. barn

ReferencesEdit

  • Jacob Poole (1867), William Barnes, editor, A Glossary, With some Pieces of Verse, of the old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, London: J. Russell Smith