See also: ˜ [U+02DC SMALL TILDE], [U+2053 SWUNG DASH], ◌ٓ, and ◌ۤ
Wave Dash.svg
~ U+007E, ~
TILDE
[unassigned: U+007F–U+009F]
}
[U+007D]
Basic Latin  
[U+00A0]
◌̃ U+0303, ̃
COMBINING TILDE
◌̂
[U+0302]
Combining Diacritical Marks ◌̄
[U+0304]
U+FF5E, ~
FULLWIDTH TILDE

[U+FF5D]
Halfwidth and Fullwidth Forms
[U+FF5F]

TranslingualEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Diacritical markEdit

~

  1. (IPA) A modifier indicating nasalization.
    The French term "bon vivant" is pronounced /bɔ̃ vi.vɑ̃/.

SymbolEdit

~

  1. In East-Asian languages, indicates a range of numbers
    Example, 3~10 = "3 to 10"; ~9 = "up to nine"; 50~ = "50 and greater."
  2. (mathematics) "is equivalent to"; "twiddles"
  3. "is of the same order of magnitude as"
  4. (logic) negation
    ~p
  5. (linguistics) alternating with
  6. (computing) user's home directory in Unix-like operating systems
  7. (in dictionaries) Replaces the headword in derivatives or example sentences, to save space.
    black, adj: of the colour perceived in the absence of light. ~ eye: one that has been visibly bruised.

Usage notesEdit

In English, this is called tilde. The symbol may be placed mid-line or superscript that depends on fonts, or use swung dash (⁓) that is always mid-line.

Distinguish two stacked nasal tildes from a double tilde:  ͌

SynonymsEdit

  • (logical negations): ¬, !
  • (replaces the headword in example sentences):

Derived termsEdit

  • ~ ~ (encloses text to indicate snarkiness)

EnglishEdit

Diacritical markEdit

~ (obsolete)

  1. Written on a letter, usually a vowel, in place of an omitted n or m.
    cõtemptcontempt

EtymologyEdit

(indicating emotion): Perhaps borrowed from Japanese ~, , , emphatic form of (long vowel mark).

SymbolEdit

~

  1. (mathematics, Internet, text messaging) approximately
    She brought ~10 shirts for a two-day trip.
  2. (Internet, text messaging) Indicating joy, elation, excitement, or a playful tone.
    Awesome~ I hope you enjoy your trip!

See alsoEdit

  • (approximately):

ChineseEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • (the fullwidth tilde)

Punctuation markEdit

~

  1. Indicates the starting point of a range; from.
  2. Indicating the lengthening of a pronunciation.

GreenlandicEdit

Diacritical markEdit

~

  1. (in the old orthography) Used over a vowel to indicate gemination of both that vowel and the following consonant.

JapaneseEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • (the fullwidth tilde)
  • (the wave dash)

Punctuation markEdit

~

  1. Indicates the starting point of a range; from.
  2. Indicating the lengthening of a pronunciation.

KoreanEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • ~ (the halfwidth tilde)
  • (the fullwidth tilde)

Punctuation markEdit

~

  1. Indicates the starting point of a range; from.
  2. Indicating the lengthening of a pronunciation.

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

Developed in cursive writing from n on top.

Diacritical markEdit

~

  1. Written on a letter, usually a vowel, in place of an omitted n or m.
    cũcum
    ī̃fluenteīnfluente
    ñnōn
    quīcũquequīcumque or quīcunque

DescendantsEdit

  • Old English: ¯
  • Old French: ~
    • Middle French: ~
  • German: ~
  • Portuguese: ~
  • Spanish: ~

Middle EnglishEdit

Diacritical markEdit

~

  1. Written on a letter, usually a vowel, in place of an omitted n or m.

DescendantsEdit

  • English: ~

Middle FrenchEdit

Diacritical markEdit

~

  1. Written on a letter, usually a vowel, in place of an omitted n or m.
    ãan
    en

Old FrenchEdit

Diacritical markEdit

~

  1. Written on a letter, usually a vowel, in place of an omitted n or m.
    ãan
    cointemtcointement
    en

DescendantsEdit

  • Middle French: ~

PortugueseEdit

Diacritical markEdit

~

  1. A diacritical mark of the Latin script, called til (tilde) in Portuguese, and found on Ã/ã and Õ/õ.

Usage notesEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Cláudio Moreno (2009-05-19), “til não é acento”, in sualíngua[2] (in Portuguese), archived from the original on 26 September 2013, retrieved 2015-07-08

SpanishEdit

Diacritical markEdit

~

  1. A diacritical mark of the Latin script, called virgulilla (tilde) in Spanish, and found on Ñ/ñ.

VietnameseEdit

Diacritical markEdit

~

  1. A diacritical mark of the Latin script, called dấu ngã (tumbling mark) in Vietnamese, and found on Ã/ã, /, /, /, /, Ĩ/ĩ, Õ/õ, /, /, Ũ/ũ, / and /. Used to indicate mid-rising, glottalized tone.

Usage notesEdit

In some dialects of Vietnamese, particularly Saigonese, the mid-rising, glottalized tone is conflated with the mid falling-rising, harsh tone represented by ̉. Therefore, speakers of Saigonese often use ̉ in words that are spelled with a tilde in standard written Vietnamese.

In Vietnamese handwriting and signmaking, the letter I/i retains its tittle.

In Vietnamese handwriting, when the tilde is combined with the circumflex, the tilde's left side may be omitted and its right side curled.


YorubaEdit

Diacritical markEdit

~

  1. (obsolete) A diacritical mark of the Latin script, called àmì fàágùn (lengthend mark). Formerly used to indicate any sequence of tones on extended vowels

See alsoEdit

tone marks