Last modified on 20 May 2014, at 22:47

GalicianEdit

Etymology 1Edit

NounEdit

ás f pl

  1. plural form of á

Etymology 2Edit

From contraction of preposition a (to, towards) + feminine plural definite article as (the)

ContractionEdit

ás f pl (masculine sg ao, feminine sg á, masculine plural aos)

  1. to the, towards the

HungarianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Unknown origin.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

ás

  1. to dig

Derived termsEdit

With verb prefixes

IcelandicEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse áss, from Proto-Germanic *ansaz.

NounEdit

ás m (genitive singular áss, nominative plural ásar)

  1. beam, rafter, pole
  2. axis
DeclensionEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Norse áss, likely from Proto-Germanic *amsaz, cognate with Gothic 𐌰𐌼𐍃 (ams, shoulder), but possibly the same as ás (1).

NounEdit

ás m (genitive singular áss, nominative plural ásar)

  1. a long low hill, a (low) ridge
DeclensionEdit

Etymology 3Edit

From Latin ās, perhaps via Middle Low German.

NounEdit

ás m (genitive singular áss, nominative plural ásar)

  1. pip (one of the spots on a die)
  2. the side of a die that has only one pip
  3. ace (playing card)
DeclensionEdit

Etymology 4Edit

From Old Norse áss, ǫ́ss, from Proto-Germanic *ansuz, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂énsus, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂ens- (to engender, beget).

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

ás m (genitive singular áss, nominative plural æsir)

  1. one of the Æsir, the principal Norse gods

AnagramsEdit


PortugueseEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • az (obsolete)

EtymologyEdit

From Latin as (a type of Roman coin).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ás m (plural ases)

  1. ace (card with a single spot)
  2. ace (an expert at something)
  3. (military aviation) ace (pilot who shot down five or more enemy aircraft)

SynonymsEdit