See also: Aber

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse apr, *appr, *ampr (cold, sharp, chilly, bad, sad), from Proto-Germanic *ampraz (sour, bitter, sharp, evil), from Proto-Indo-European *ōmos-, *am(r)-, *om- (raw, bitter, sharp tasting, sour). Cognate with Icelandic napur (biting), Swedish amper (sharp, pungent), Dutch amper (sharp, pungent, bitter, immature), German Ampfer (a sorrel), Latin amārus (morose, bitter, harsh). Related to Old English ampre (dock, sorrel). See amper.

AdjectiveEdit

aber (comparative more aber, superlative most aber)

  1. (UK dialectal) Sharp; keen.
  2. (UK dialectal) With sharp outlines; clear; distinct.
  3. (UK dialectal) Sharp-sighted; keen; observant; watchful.
  4. (UK dialectal) Keen; eager; ready; anxious.

VerbEdit

aber (third-person singular simple present abers, present participle abering, simple past and past participle abered)

  1. (transitive, UK dialectal) To sharpen, as a knife.
  2. (transitive, UK dialectal) To stir up and make bright, as a fire.

AragoneseEdit

VerbEdit

aber

  1. to have

DanishEdit

NounEdit

aber c

  1. plural indefinite of abe

VerbEdit

aber

  1. present tense of abe

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from Breton aber.

NounEdit

aber m (plural abers)

  1. (geography) A ria, especially one in Brittany.

GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old High German avur.

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

aber

  1. again (mostly used in abermals, yet another time)

ConjunctionEdit

aber

  1. but, though

Derived termsEdit


Serbo-CroatianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from Ottoman Turkish خبر (haber), from Arabic خبر (xábar).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ǎber/
  • Hyphenation: a‧ber

NounEdit

àber m (Cyrillic spelling а̀бер)

  1. news information
  2. message
  3. sensation, feeling

SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from German aber ("but"), turned into a noun (as in "no buts and no ifs").

NounEdit

aber n

  1. a problem, an obstacle, a difficulty

DeclensionEdit

The plural is the same, but definite forms do not apply.

ReferencesEdit


WelshEdit

EtymologyEdit

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

NounEdit

aber m, f (plural aberoedd or ebyr)

  1. estuary, mouth of a river
Last modified on 26 March 2014, at 21:11