Last modified on 6 December 2014, at 09:28

han

BasqueEdit

PronounEdit

han

  1. there

CatalanEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

han

  1. third-person plural present indicative form of haver

DanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse hann (dative hánum).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

han c (singular definite hannen, plural indefinite hanner)

  1. male, he

InflectionEdit

PronounEdit

han (genitive hans, accusative ham)

  1. he

See alsoEdit


GalicianEdit

VerbEdit

han

  1. third-person plural present indicative of haber

Gwich'inEdit

EtymologyEdit

Cognate with Tlingit héen (water, river).

NounEdit

han

  1. river

JapaneseEdit

RomanizationEdit

han

  1. rōmaji reading of はん

JèrriaisEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse hampr.

NounEdit

han m (plural hans)

  1. galangal

MandarinEdit

RomanizationEdit

han

  1. Nonstandard spelling of hān.
  2. Nonstandard spelling of hán.
  3. Nonstandard spelling of hǎn.
  4. Nonstandard spelling of hàn.

Usage notesEdit

  • English transcriptions of Mandarin speech often fail to distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without the appropriate indication of tone.

Middle EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Contracted infinitive and plural present of haven.

VerbEdit

han

  1. (transitive) To have; have - Piers Plowman.

Norwegian BokmålEdit

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

han

  1. he, him

Usage notesEdit

Traditionally, the word for him in bokmål is ham. However, as most people use only han in regular conversations, it used to be a somewhat common mistake when writing bokmål. It is now allowed to use either han and ham as the object form. Additionally, nynorsk uses almost exclusively han as both subject and object form, though honom is a rarely used correct object form. Ham is not an allowed word in nynorsk.

See alsoEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

han

  1. he (third person singular, masculine)

See alsoEdit


Old SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse hann.

PronounEdit

han

  1. he

DescendantsEdit


RohingyaEdit

NounEdit

han

  1. ear

Samoan Plantation PidginEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English hand.

NounEdit

han

  1. arm
  2. hand

Usage notesEdit

Only used to refer to a human; for an animal, the equivalent parts are all labelled as lek.

ReferencesEdit

  • Ulrike Mosel, Tolai and Tok Pisin: the influence of the substratum on the development of New Guinea Pidgin (1980)
  • Mühlhäusler, Peter (1983). "Samoan Plantation Pidgin English and the origin of New Guinea Pidgin", in Ellen Woolford and William Washabaugh: The Social Context of Creolization, 28–76.

Serbo-CroatianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Ottoman Turkish خان (han), from Persian خانه (khâne, house).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

hȃn m (Cyrillic spelling ха̑н)

  1. inn

DeclensionEdit


SpanishEdit

VerbEdit

han

  1. Second-person plural (ustedes) present indicative form of haber.
  2. Third-person plural (ellos, ellas, also used with ustedes?) present indicative form of haber.

SwedishEdit

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

han

  1. he, the third person singular, masculine, nominative case.
  2. (archaic or dialect) him (in standard Swedish, this is honom)
    jag såg han or ja' såg'en/'an/'n (standard Swedish: jag såg honom)
    I saw him

DeclensionEdit


TetumEdit

VerbEdit

han

  1. to eat

Tok PisinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English hand.

NounEdit

han

  1. hand
  2. arm
  3. foreleg (of an animal)
  4. wing (of a bird)
  5. branch (of a tree)
  6. branch (figurative)

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Ulrike Mosel, Tolai and Tok Pisin: the influence of the substratum on the development of New Guinea Pidgin (1980)
  • Mühlhäusler, Peter (1983). "Samoan Plantation Pidgin English and the origin of New Guinea Pidgin", in Ellen Woolford and William Washabaugh: The Social Context of Creolization, 28–76.

TurkishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

han (definite accusative [[{{{1}}}#Turkish|{{{1}}}]], plural [[{{{2}}}#Turkish|{{{2}}}]])

  1. khan
  2. inn (for caravans)