Last modified on 16 June 2014, at 00:46

batter

EnglishEdit

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PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old French batre (to beat).

VerbEdit

batter (third-person singular simple present batters, present participle battering, simple past and past participle battered)

  1. to hit or strike violently and repeatedly.
    He battered his wife with a walking stick.
  2. to coat with batter (the food ingredient).
    I prefer it when they batter the cod with breadcrumbs.
  3. to defeat soundly; to thrash
    Leeds United battered Charlton 7-0.
  4. (UK, slang, usually in the passive) To intoxicate
    That cocktails will batter you!
    I was battered last night on our pub crawl.
  5. (metalworking) To flatten (metal) by hammering, so as to compress it inwardly and spread it outwardly.
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old French bateure (the action of beating), from batre (to beat).

NounEdit

batter (plural batters)

  1. A beaten mixture of flour and liquid (usually egg and milk), used for baking (e.g. pancakes, cake, or Yorkshire pudding) or to coat food (e.g. fish) prior to frying
    To the dismay of his mother, the boy put his finger into the cake batter.
  2. A binge, a heavy drinking session.
    When he went on a batter, he became very violent.
  3. A paste of clay or loam.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Holland to this entry?)
  4. (printing) A bruise on the face of a plate or of type in the form.
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

Unknown.

VerbEdit

batter (third-person singular simple present batters, present participle battering, simple past and past participle battered)

  1. (architecture) To slope (of walls, buildings etc.).

NounEdit

batter (plural batters)

  1. An incline on the outer face of a built wall.
    Hydroseeding of unvegetated batters is planned.
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 4Edit

bat +‎ -er (agent suffix).

NounEdit

batter (plural batters)

  1. (baseball) The player attempting to hit the ball with a bat.
    The first batter hit the ball into the corner for a double.
SynonymsEdit
Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


ItalianEdit

VerbEdit

batter

  1. apocopic form of battere

Derived termsEdit


LuxembourgishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old High German bittar.

AdjectiveEdit

batter

  1. bitter

See alsoEdit


ScotsEdit

NounEdit

batter (uncountable)

  1. batter
  2. glue; paste