Last modified on 9 December 2014, at 09:41

dock

EnglishEdit

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PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Middle English dokke, from Old English docce, from Proto-Germanic *dukk-- (compare Old Danish dokke ‘water-dock’, West Flemish dokke, dokkebladeren (coltsfoot, butterbur)), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰeu- ‘dark’ (compare Latvian duga ‘scum, slime on water’).[1][2]

NounEdit

dock (plural docks)

  1. Any of the genus Rumex of coarse weedy plants with small green flowers related to buckwheat, especially the common dock, and used as potherbs and in folk medicine, especially in curing nettle rash.
  2. A burdock plant, or the leaves of that plant.
TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Vladimir Orel, A Handbook of Germanic Etymology, s.v. “*đukkōn” (Leiden: Brill, 2003), 78.
  2. ^ William Morris, ed., The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, coll. edn., s.v. “dock4” (Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1979), 387; Calvert Watkins, ed., “Indo-European Roots”, Appendix, AHD, s.v. “dheu-1”, 1513.

Etymology 2Edit

Middle English dok, from Old English -docca (as in fingirdoccana (genitive pl.) ‘finger muscles’), from Proto-Germanic *dukkōn (compare West Frisian dok ‘bunch, ball (twine)’, Low German Dokke ‘bundle of straw’, Icelandic dokkur ‘stumpy tail’), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰeu-k- ‘to spin, shake’ (compare Lithuanian dvė̃kti ‘to breathe, wheeze’, dvãkas ‘breath’, Albanian dak ‘big ram’, Sanskrit dhukśati ‘to blow’).[1]

NounEdit

dock (plural docks)

  1. The fleshy root of an animal's tail.
  2. The part of the tail which remains after the tail has been docked.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Grew to this entry?)
  3. (obsolete) The buttocks or anus.
  4. A leather case to cover the clipped or cut tail of a horse.
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

dock (third-person singular simple present docks, present participle docking, simple past and past participle docked)

  1. (transitive) To cut off a section of an animal's tail.
    • 1898, Winston Churchill, chapter 4, The Celebrity:
      The Celebrity, by arts unknown, induced Mrs. Judge Short and two other ladies to call at Mohair on an afternoon when Mr. Cooke was trying a trotter on the track. [] Their example was followed by others at a time when the master of Mohair was superintending in person the docking of some two-year-olds, and equally invisible.
  2. (transitive) To reduce (wages); to deduct from.
  3. (transitive) To cut off, bar, or destroy.
    to dock an entail
TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Wolfgang Pfeifer, ed., Etymologisches Wörterbuch des Deutschen, s.v. “Docke” (Munich: Deutscher Taschenbucher Vertrag, 2005).

Etymology 3Edit

From Middle English dock ‘mud channel’, from Middle Dutch docke ‘channel’ (modern dok ‘lock (canal)’), from Old Italian doccia ‘conduit, canal’ or Medieval Latin ducta, ductus ‘id.’. More at douche and duct.[1]

NounEdit

dock (plural docks)

  1. A fixed structure attached to shore to which a vessel is secured when in port.
    • 1915, Emerson Hough, The Purchase Price, Ch.I:
      With just the turn of a shoulder she indicated the water front, where, at the end of the dock on which they stood, lay the good ship, Mount Vernon, river packet, the black smoke already pouring from her stacks.
  2. The body of water between two piers.
  3. A structure attached to shore for loading and unloading vessels.
  4. A section of a hotel or restaurant.
    coffee dock
  5. (electronics) A device designed as a base for holding a connected portable appliance such as a laptop computer (in this case, referred to as a docking station), or a mobile telephone, for providing the necessary electrical charge for its autonomy, or as a hardware extension for additional capabilities.
  6. (computing, graphical user interface) A toolbar that provides the user with a way of launching applications, and switching between running applications.
  7. An act of docking; joining two things together.
SynonymsEdit
  • (body of water between piers): slip
  • (structure for loading and unloading vessels): wharf, quay
HypernymsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

VerbEdit

dock (third-person singular simple present docks, present participle docking, simple past and past participle docked)

  1. (intransitive) To land at a harbour.
    • 29 February 2012, Aidan Foster-Carter, BBC News North Korea: The denuclearisation dance resumes[1]
      On 28 February, for example, a US Navy ship docked in Nampo, the port for Pyongyang, with equipment for joint searches for remains of US soldiers missing from the 1950-1953 Korean War. China may look askance at the US and North Korean militaries working together like this.
  2. To join two moving items.
    • 2013 June 1, “Ideas coming down the track”, The Economist, volume 407, number 8838, page 13 (Technology Quarterly): 
      A “moving platform” scheme [] is more technologically ambitious than maglev trains even though it relies on conventional rails. Local trains would use side-by-side rails to roll alongside intercity trains and allow passengers to switch trains by stepping through docking bays.
  3. (transitive, computing) To drag a user interface element (such as a toolbar) to a position on screen where it snaps into place.
TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Marlies Philippa et al., eds., Etymologisch Woordenboek van het Nederlands, A-Z, s.v. “dok” (Amsterdam UP, 3 Dec. 2009): <http://www.etymologie.nl>.

Etymology 4Edit

Originally criminal slang; from or akin to Dutch (Flemish) dok 'cage, hutch'.

NounEdit

dock (plural docks)

  1. Part of a courtroom where the accused sits.
TranslationsEdit
Related termsEdit

SwedishEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

dock

  1. though, however, still, nevertheless
    Om jag än måste dö med dig, så skall jag dock förvisso icke förneka dig.
    Though I should die with thee, yet will I not deny thee (Matthew 26:35)
    Dock, natt skall icke förbliva där nu ångest råder.
    Nevertheless the dimness [shall] not [be] such as [was] in her vexation (Isaiah 9:1)
    Man river åt sig till höger och förbliver dock hungrig, man tager för sig till vänster och bliver dock ej mätt
    And he shall snatch on the right hand, and be hungry; and he shall eat on the left hand, and they shall not be satisfied (Isaiah 9:20)