Last modified on 12 November 2014, at 21:16

animal

EnglishEdit

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PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English animal, from Old French animal, from Latin animal, a nominal use of an adjective from animale, neuter of animalis, from anima (breath, spirit). Displaced native Middle English deor, der (animal) (from Old English dēor (animal)), Middle English reother (animal, neat) (from Old English hrīþer, hrȳþer (neat, ox)).

NounEdit

animal (plural animals)

  1. In scientific usage, a multicellular organism that is usually mobile, whose cells are not encased in a rigid cell wall (distinguishing it from plants and fungi) and which derives energy solely from the consumption of other organisms (distinguishing it from plants).
    A cat is an animal, not a plant.   Humans are also animals, under the scientific definition, as we are not plants.
  2. In non-scientific usage, any member of the kingdom Animalia other than a human being.
  3. In non-scientific usage, any land-living vertebrate (i.e. not birds, fishes, insects etc.).
    • 2013 July-August, Henry Petroski, “Geothermal Energy”, American Scientist, volume 101, number 4: 
      Ancient nomads, wishing to ward off the evening chill and enjoy a meal around a campfire, had to collect wood and then spend time and effort coaxing the heat of friction out from between sticks to kindle a flame. With more settled people, animals were harnessed to capstans or caged in treadmills to turn grist into meal.
  4. (figuratively) A person who behaves wildly; a bestial, brutal, brutish, cruel, or inhuman person.
    My students are animals.
  5. (informal) A person of a particular type.
    a political animal
SynonymsEdit
HyponymsEdit
Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Etymology 2Edit

From Latin animalis, from either anima (breath, spirit) or animus. Originally distinct from the noun, it became associated with attributive use of the noun and is now indistinguishable from it.

AdjectiveEdit

animal (not comparable)

  1. Of or relating to animals.
    animal instincts
  2. Raw, base, unhindered by social codes.
    animal passions
  3. Pertaining to the spirit or soul; relating to sensation or innervation.
    • 2003, To explain what activated the flesh, ‘animal spirits’ were posited, superfine fluids which shuttled between the mind and the vitals, conveying messages and motion. — Roy Porter, Flesh in the Age of Reason (Penguin 2004, p. 47)
  4. (slang, Ireland) Excellent.
SynonymsEdit
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AnagramsEdit


AsturianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from Latin animal.

AdjectiveEdit

animal (epicene, plural animales)

  1. animal

NounEdit

animal m (plural animales)

  1. animal

CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from Latin animal.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

animal m (plural animals)

  1. animal

AdjectiveEdit

animal m, f (masculine and feminine plural animals)

  1. animal

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from Latin animal.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

animal m (plural animaux)

  1. animal

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

animal m (feminine animale, masculine plural animaux, feminine plural animales)

  1. animal

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

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External linksEdit


GalicianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from Latin animal.

AdjectiveEdit

animal m, f (plural animais)

  1. animal

NounEdit

animal m (plural animais)

  1. animal

Haitian CreoleEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French animal, from Latin animal.

NounEdit

animal

  1. animal

SynonymsEdit


InterlinguaEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

animal (plural animales)

  1. animal

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From anima (breath, life)

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

animal n (genitive animālis); third declension

  1. animal
  2. living creature

InflectionEdit

Third declension neuter "pure" i-stem.

Number Singular Plural
nominative animal animālia
genitive animālis animālium
dative animālī animālibus
accusative animal animālia
ablative animālī animālibus
vocative animal animālia

SynonymsEdit

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DescendantsEdit


Middle FrenchEdit

NounEdit

animal m (plural animaux or animaulx)

  1. animal

SynonymsEdit


PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from Latin animal. See also alimária.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

animal m (plural animais)

  1. animal

AdjectiveEdit

animal m, f (plural animais; comparable)

  1. Or or relating to animals; animal.
  2. (slang) cool; nice

InflectionEdit


RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from French animal, from Latin animal.

AdjectiveEdit

animal 4 nom/acc forms

  1. animal, animalistic
  2. brutal

DeclensionEdit

AdverbEdit

animal

  1. brutally

NounEdit

animal n (plural animale)

  1. animal

DeclensionEdit


RomanschEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from Latin animal.

NounEdit

animal m (plural animals)

  1. (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan, Sutsilvan, Surmiran, Vallader) animal

SynonymsEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from Latin animal. See also alimaña.

NounEdit

animal m (plural animales)

  1. animal

Tok PisinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English animal.

NounEdit

animal

  1. animal (members of Kingdom Animalia that are not humans)
    • 1989, Buk Baibel long Tok Pisin, Bible Society of Papua New Guinea, Genesis 1:25 (translation here):
      God i kamapim ol kain kain animal bilong ples na ol bikpela na liklik animal bilong bus. God i lukim olgeta dispela samting i gutpela, na em i amamas.


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