Last modified on 4 August 2014, at 10:24
See also: lúg, ług, Lug, and LUG

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Probably from Old Norse (compare Swedish lugga, Norwegian lugge). Noun is via Scots lugge, probably from Old Norse (compare Swedish and Norwegian lugg). Probably related to slug (lazy, slow-moving), which is from similar Scandinavian sources.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lug (plural lugs)

  1. The act of hauling or dragging.
    a hard lug
  2. That which is hauled or dragged.
    The pack is a heavy lug.
  3. Anything that moves slowly.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Ascham to this entry?)
  4. A lug nut.
  5. (electricity) A device for terminating an electrical conductor to facilitate the mechanical connection; to the conductor it may be crimped to form a cold weld, soldered or have pressure from a screw.
  6. A part of something which sticks out, used as a handle or support.
  7. A fool, a large man.
  8. (UK) An ear or ear lobe.
  9. A wood box used for transporting fruit or vegetables.
  10. (slang) A request for money, as for political purposes.
    They put the lug on him at the courthouse.
  11. (UK, dialect) A rod or pole.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Wright to this entry?)
  12. (UK, dialect) A measure of length equal to 16½ feet.
    • Spenser
      Eight lugs of ground.
  13. (nautical) A lugsail.
  14. (harness) The leather loop or ear by which a shaft is held up.
  15. A lugworm.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

lug (third-person singular simple present lugs, present participle lugging, simple past and past participle lugged)

  1. (transitive) To haul or drag along (especially something heavy); to carry.
    Why do you always lug around so many books?
    • Collier
      They must divide the image among them, and so lug off every one his share.
  2. (transitive) To run at too slow a speed.
    When driving up a hill, choose a lower gear so you don't lug the engine.
  3. (transitive, nautical) To carry an excessive amount of sail for the conditions prevailing.

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • The New Geordie Dictionary, Frank Graham, 1987, ISBN 0946928118
  • A Dictionary of North East Dialect, Bill Griffiths, 2005, Northumbria University Press, ISBN 1904794165
  • Newcastle 1970s, Scott Dobson and Dick Irwin, [1]
  • A List of words and phrases in everyday use by the natives of Hetton-le-Hole in the County of Durham, F.M.T.Palgrave, English Dialect Society vol.74, 1896, [2]

AfrikaansEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Dutch lucht.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lug (uncountable, diminutive luggie)

  1. air

Usage notesEdit

The plural form of lug is lugte, but it exists only in literary texts and is otherwise never used.


AlbanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Albanian *lug(ā), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)leuK- 'to gulp/drink (down), swallow'. Cognate to Lithuanian liũgas (morass), Old Norse slok (trough, spillway), Middle High German slūch (gulf, abyss)[1]. Possibly related to Illyrian Loúgeon, a toponym denoting a swampy place in Strabo. Plural lugje.

NounEdit

lug m

  1. trough, (water)channel, spillway
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Albanische Etymologien (Untersuchungen zum albanischen Erbwortschatz), Bardhyl Demiraj, Leiden Studies in Indo-European 7; Amsterdam - Atlanta 1997, p.245

Serbo-CroatianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *lǫgъ.

NounEdit

lȗg m (Cyrillic spelling лу̑г)

  1. lye

DeclensionEdit


SloveneEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *lǫgъ.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lúg m inan (genitive lúga, uncountable)

  1. lye

DeclensionEdit