Last modified on 23 July 2014, at 16:35
For the list of public logs on this wiki, see Special:Log.
See also: lóg, lög, and løg

TranslingualEdit

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SymbolEdit

log

  1. (mathematics) logarithm
    if x=b^y then \log_{b}(x)=y

SynonymsEdit

  • (with base e) ln
  • (with base 10) lg

Usage notesEdit

If not specified, the assumed base of the logarithm is either 10 or e, depending on context.

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit


EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Wikipedia has articles on:

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Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English logge, of unknown origin. That it descends from Old Norse lág (a felled tree)[1] is widely doubted on phonological grounds; an alternative is sound expression of the notion of something massive.

NounEdit

log (plural logs)

  1. The trunk of a dead tree, cleared of branches.
    They walked across the stream on a fallen log.
  2. Any bulky piece as cut from the above, used as timber, fuel etc.
    • 1995: New American Standard Bible: Matthew 7, 3 – 5
      Why do you look at the speck that is in your brother's eye, but do not notice the log that is in your own eye? Or how can you say to your brother, "Let me take the speck out of your eye," and behold, the log is in your own eye? You hypocrite, first take the log out of your own eye, and then you will see clearly to take the speck out of your brother's eye.
  3. Anything shaped like a log; a cylinder.
    • 1999, Glen Duncan, Hope
      [] it was a thing of sinuous durability, wound around the spirit like a tapeworm around a log of shit.
    • 2011, Edward Espe Brown, The Complete Tassajara Cookbook
      Dip both sides in the sauce on the plate and then arrange a log of cheese filling down the middle of the tortilla.
  4. (nautical) A floating device, usually of wood, used in navigation to estimate the speed of a vessel through water.
  5. A logbook.
  6. (figuratively) A blockhead; a very stupid person.
  7. (surfing slang) A longboard.
    • 1999, Neal Miyake [1]
      I know he hadn’t surfed on a log much in his childhood
  8. (figuratively) A rolled cake with filling.
  9. (mining) A weight or block near the free end of a hoisting rope to prevent it from being drawn through the sheave.
  10. (vulgar) A piece of feces.
SynonymsEdit
  • (logbook):
HyponymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

VerbEdit

log (third-person singular simple present logs, present participle logging, simple past and past participle logged)

  1. (transitive) To cut trees into logs.
  2. (transitive) To cut down (trees).
    • 2013 June 29, “Unspontaneous combustion”, The Economist, volume 407, number 8842, page 29: 
      Since the mid-1980s, when Indonesia first began to clear its bountiful forests on an industrial scale in favour of lucrative palm-oil plantations, “haze” has become an almost annual occurrence in South-East Asia. The cheapest way to clear logged woodland is to burn it, producing an acrid cloud of foul white smoke that, carried by the wind, can cover hundreds, or even thousands, of square miles.
  3. (transitive) To travel at a specified speed, as ascertained by chip log.
  4. (intransitive) To cut down trees in an area, harvesting and transporting the logs as wood.
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From logbook, itself from log (above) + book

NounEdit

log (plural logs)

  1. A logbook, or journal of a vessel (or aircraft)'s progress
  2. A chronological record of actions, performances, computer/network usage, etc.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

VerbEdit

log (third-person singular simple present logs, present participle logging, simple past and past participle logged)

  1. (transitive) To make, to add an entry (or more) in a log or logbook.
    to log the miles travelled by a ship
  2. (transitive) To travel (a distance) as shown in a logbook
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

VerbEdit

log (third-person singular simple present logs, present participle logging, simple past and past participle logged)

  1. (obsolete) To move to and fro; to rock.

Etymology 4Edit

Hebrew

NounEdit

log (plural logs)

  1. A Hebrew measure of liquids, containing 2.37 gills.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of W. H. Ward to this entry?)

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ log in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913

AlbanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Indo-European *legh- 'to put down, to lie down'. Compare Old Frisian lōch, Middle High German urlage (fate, battle), Old English log 'place', Old Norse løgi (tranquillity), Greek λόχος (lóchos, confinement), Tocharian A lake, Tocharian B leke 'lair', Old Irish lige (bad, grave).

NounEdit

log m (indefinite plural logje, definite singular logu, definite plural logët)

  1. battlefield, ground (where warriors or men gather for council)
  2. level patch (of ground)
Related termsEdit

DutchEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia nl

Presumably Germanic, cognates may include English log, lag, Middle Low German luggich 'slow'

AdjectiveEdit

log (comparative logger, superlative logst)

  1. lumbering, inert, slow in movement; immobile
  2. (originally) plumb, (too) heavy in built ande/or weight
  3. cumbersome, hard to move or change
  4. dull, uninspired
DeclensionEdit
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Germanic: cognate with liegen 'to (tell a) lie', German lügen

NounEdit

log n (plural loggen, diminutive logje n)

  1. A lie, violation of the truth
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

Germanic: from equivalent German Loch 'hole, opening, cavity'

NounEdit

log n (plural loggen)

  1. (obsolete) An alternative form of loch
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 4Edit

Germanic: from English log (see above), sense (and short for) chip log

NounEdit

log m (plural loggen, diminutive logje n)

  1. A chip log, instrument to measure a vessel's speed
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit

GermanEdit

VerbEdit

log

  1. First-person singular preterite of lügen.
  2. Third-person singular preterite of lügen.

LatvianEdit

NounEdit

log

  1. vocative singular of logs

Old EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /loːɡ/, [loːɣ]

Etymology 1Edit

Proto-Germanic *lōgą, from Proto-Indo-European *legh-. Cognate with Old Frisian lōch, Old High German luog. The Indo-European root is also the source of Greek λέκτρον (léktron), Latin lectus (bed), Albanian log (place for men, gathering), Celtic *leg- (Old Irish lige, Irish luighe), Slavic *ležati (Russian лежать (ležát’)).

NounEdit

lōg n

  1. A place, stead
    on his log: in his place; instead of him.
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Inflected forms.

VerbEdit

lōg

  1. first-person singular preterite of lēan
  2. third-person singular preterite of lēan

SloveneEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

lóg m inan (genitive lóga, nominative plural lógi)

  1. grove
  2. small forest

DeclensionEdit

This noun needs an inflection-table template.


SwedishEdit

VerbEdit

log

  1. past tense of le.

VolapükEdit

EtymologyEdit

Compound of French le and German Auge

NounEdit

log (plural logs)

  1. eye

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit