EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old English ne, from Proto-Germanic *ne, from Proto-Indo-European *ne.

AdverbEdit

ne (not comparable)

  1. (obsolete) Not.
    • 13??, Geoffrey Chaucer, The Canterbury Tales
      He nevere yet no vilaynie ne sayde.
    • 1512, Robert Copland, The History of Helyas:
      And whan the good quene herde these pyteous tydynges lytel lacked that the ne dyed for sorowe / wherfore all lamentably the began to complayne her sayenge.
    • 1812, Lord Byron, "Childe Harold's Pilgrimage", Canto I, 2:
      Whilom in Albion's isle there dwelt a youth, / Who ne in virtue's ways did take delight [...].

ConjunctionEdit

ne

  1. (obsolete) Nor.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, III.1:
      But to her cry they list not lenden eare, / Ne ought the more their mightie strokes surceasse.
    • 1798, Samuel Coleridge, "The Rime of the Ancient Mariner", ll. 443-6:
      The pang, the curse, with which they died, / Had never pass'd away; / I could not draw my een from theirs / Ne turn them up to pray.

AnagramsEdit


AlbanianEdit

PronunciationEdit

EtymologyEdit

The nominative-accusative is from accusative Proto-Albanian *nōs, stressed form of clitic Proto-Indo-European *nos, which is continued by the clitic na. Neve and nesh are innovated, but Gheg retains dative nahe (Old Albanian nae) from a genitive *nosōm.

PronounEdit

ne (accusative ne, dative neve, ablative nesh)

  1. we

DeclensionEdit

See alsoEdit


CatalanEdit

PronounEdit

ne (enclitic, contracted 'n, proclitic en, contracted proclitic n')

  1. represents an indeterminate number or quantity of a given noun
  2. represents a place (associated with the action described by the verb) that would be introduced by the preposition de
  3. replaces a phrase introduced by the preposition de
  4. replaces the object of a causative verb

Usage notesEdit

  • Ne cannot be used more than once as the object of a given verb.
  • While ne is usually used to replace phrases beginning with the prepostion de, adverbial phrases (eg de pressa) are replaced with hi.
  • Ne is sometimes used instead of ho to replace an adjective or indefinite noun as the predicate of a verb.
  • Ne is sometimes used popularly to add emphasis to a sentence: in this sense, it has no translation in English.

See alsoEdit


CzechEdit

PronunciationEdit

InterjectionEdit

ne

  1. no!

ParticleEdit

ne

  1. not

See alsoEdit


DalmatianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin nec, neque. Compare Italian , French and Spanish ni, Romanian nici.

AdverbEdit

ne

  1. neither

DutchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

ArticleEdit

ne

  1. (dialect, Flemish) a, an
    ne man
    a man

Usage notesEdit

In Flanders this is commonly used as the dialectal form of een. It is only used for masculine words, while een is still used for feminine and neuter words.

The form nen is used before vowels (as the English an) and certain consonants (commonly b, d and t), differing from dialect to dialect. The same happens for the definite article de which becomes den, and sometimes for adjectives as well.

AnagramsEdit


EsperantoEdit

ParticleEdit

ne

  1. no
  2. not
  3. non-

AntonymsEdit


FinnishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • Hyphenation: ne
  • Rhymes: -e
  • IPA(key): [ne]

PronounEdit

ne (plural, stem nii-)

  1. (demonstrative, of things and animals) they (plural of the pronoun se (“it”))
  2. (demonstrative) When used like a definite article, “the” or “those”.
    Tässä ne kirjat nyt ovat. — “This is where those books are now.” (literally, “Here those books now are”)
  3. (colloquial, dialectal, of people) they (in literary standard: he).

InflectionEdit

The case suffixes are mostly regular (except inessive and elative singular). Abessive is never used in singular and extremely seldom in plural. Instructive niin is more or less a theoretical construction, since it has developed into an adverb, and its current meaning cannot be derived from ne.

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

Wikipedia

EtymologyEdit

Latin non.

PronunciationEdit

ParticleEdit

ne

  1. (literary) not (used alone to negate a verb; now chiefly with the verbs pouvoir, savoir, cesser and oser)
    • 1713, Voltaire, letter, Dec 1713:
      Je ne sais si je dois vous appeler Monsieur ou Mademoiselle [...].
      I don't know if I should call you Mr or Miss.
    • 1826, Victor Hugo, Bug-Jargal, XXXVIII:
      Le prince de France nous aime, celui d'Espagne ne cesse de nous secourir.
      The prince of France loves us, that of Spain never stops helping us.
    • 1868, Emile Zola, Madeleine Férat:
      Je n’ose te jurer que je t'aime toujours, parce que je sens bien que tu ne me croirais pas.
      I dare not swear that I still love you, for I sense that you would not believe me.
    • 1943, Jean-Paul Sartre, Réflexions sur la question juive:
      Mais je ne le crois pas : un homme qui trouve naturel de dénoncer des hommes ne peut avoir notre conception de l'humain [...].
      But I don't think so: a man who finds it natural to denounce men cannot have our idea of being human.
  2. not, no (used before a verb, with a subsequent element following; see Usage Notes, below)
    • 1851, Henri Murger, Le pays latin:
      Je ne sais rien de plus odieux que l'hypocrisie.
      I don't know anything more odious than hypocrisy.
    • 1998, Michel Houellebecq, Les Particules Élémentaires:
      Bruno se rendit compte qu'il ne serait jamais accepté par les hippies [...].
      Bruno realised that he'd never be accepted by the hippies.
    • 2012, Le Monde, 3 May 2012:
      "Il n’y a pas eu un truc auquel on ne s'attendait pas", affirme Stéphane Le Foll.
      ‘There wasn't anything we weren't expecting,’ stated Stéphane Le Foll.
  3. Used in a subordinate clause before a subjunctive verb (especially when the main verb expresses doubt or fear), to provide extra overtones of doubt or uncertainty (but not negating its verb); the so-called "pleonastic" or "expletive" ne.
    • 1829, Victor Hugo, Le Derner Jour d'un Condamné, XXVII:
      Ah! mes cheveux blanchiront avant que ma tête ne tombe!
      Oh! My hair will go white before my head falls!
    • 1837, George Sand, Mauprat:
      Oui , mais je crains qu'elle ne soit plus malade qu'elle ne l'avoue, repartit l'abbé.
      ‘Yes, but I think she might be more ill than she's letting on,’ the priest replied.
  4. (Should we delete(+) this sense?) (in comparative clauses usually translated with the positive sense of the subsequent negative)
    apprendre le français est plus facile qu'on ne pense — “learning French is easier than you think”

Usage notesEdit

  • Ne is typically followed by a negative adverbial pas, plus, jamais, guère, or (now literary) point; by a negative pronoun personne or rien; or by a negative determiner, aucun or nul.
  • In colloquial French, ne is often omitted: Je le veux pas ‘I don't want it’.
  • In literary French, ne can be used alone with certain verbs, as specified above.

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


GermanEdit

PronunciationEdit

InterjectionEdit

ne?

  1. (colloquial) no?; is it not?
    Großartig, ne? — “Great, isn’t it?”

ArticleEdit

ne

  1. (colloquial) shorthand of the feminine indefinite article eine (“an; a”)
    Möchtest du 'ne Flasche Bier? — “Would you like a bottle of beer?”

Alternative formsEdit


GothicEdit

RomanizationEdit

; Romanization of 𐌽𐌴

AdverbEdit

ne (ne)

  1. nay, no

HungarianEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

ne

  1. don't
    Ne hallgass rá! - Don't listen to him!

Usage notesEdit

Used before the verb in an imperative clause to negate that clause; ne is always used instead of nem in the imperative mood.

Derived termsEdit


IdoEdit

AdverbEdit

ne

  1. not

Isthmus ZapotecEdit

ConjunctionEdit

ne

  1. and

Istro-RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin nix, nivem, through Proto-Romanian. Compare Daco-Romanian nea, Aromanian neao.

NounEdit

ne f (definite nevu, genitive/dative lu nevu)

  1. snow

ItalianEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • Rhymes: -e

AdverbEdit

ne

  1. from there
    Ne sono venuto. — “I have come from there.”

Usage notesEdit

  • The pronoun ne replaces di là.
    Sono di Genova; ne sono venuto stamattina. — “I am from Genova; I came from there this morning.”

PronounEdit

ne

  1. of it
    Ne ho sentito parlare. — “I have heard talk of it.”
    Cosa ne pensi? — “What do you think of it?”
  2. of them (sometimes not translated in English)
    Ce ne sono due. — “There are two (of them).”

Usage notesEdit

  • The pronoun ne stands for di + [pronoun], and so can be a translation of “[preposition] + it/them” for any preposition that is translated as di in Italian.

ContractionEdit

ne

  1. apocopic form of nel
    Massimo Troisi ha vinto un oscar per la sua interpretazione ne "Il postino". — "Massimo Troisi won an Oscar for his performance in "Il Postino".

Usage notesEdit

Ne is used where nel, nella, etc, would ordinarily be used, but cannot be because the article is part of the title of a film, book, etc.

See alsoEdit

See alsoEdit


JapaneseEdit

RomanizationEdit

ne

  1. rōmaji reading of
  2. rōmaji reading of

KurdishEdit

InterjectionEdit

ne

  1. no (used to show disagreement or negation)


This Kurdish entry was created from the translations listed at no. It may be less reliable than other entries, and may be missing parts of speech or additional senses. Please also see ne in the Kurdish Wiktionary. This notice will be removed when the entry is checked. (more information) December 2008


LadinEdit

AdverbEdit

ne

  1. not

LatinEdit

InterjectionEdit

  1. truly!, indeed!; commonly connected with other affirmative particles

ConjunctionEdit

(+ subjunctive)

  1. in order not to; lest

Derived termsEdit

AdverbEdit

ne

  1. (after dummodo) not

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit


LithuanianEdit

InterjectionEdit

ne

  1. no (used to show disagreement or negation)


This Lithuanian entry was created from the translations listed at no. It may be less reliable than other entries, and may be missing parts of speech or additional senses. Please also see ne in the Lithuanian Wiktionary. This notice will be removed when the entry is checked. (more information) October 2009


LivonianEdit

PronounEdit

ne

  1. plural nominative form of tämā

LojbanEdit

CmavoEdit

ne

  1. non-restrictive version of pe;[1] which is incidentally of/associated with[2]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Lojban for Beginners, Chapter 9, §6
  2. ^ LLG's cmavo/selma'o (ma'oste) list

LugandaEdit

ConjunctionEdit

ne

  1. and (only used if the overall statement is grammatically positive)

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

p. 94, The Essentials of Luganda, J. D. Chesswas, 4th edition. Oxford University Press: Nairobi. 1967.


This entry has fewer than three known examples of actual usage, the minimum considered necessary for clear attestation, and may not be reliable. Luganda is subject to a special exemption for languages with limited documentation. If you speak it, please consider editing this entry or adding citations. See also Help and the Community Portal.

MandarinEdit

PronunciationEdit

RomanizationEdit

ne (Zhuyin ㄋㄜ˙)

  1. Pinyin reading of
  2. Pinyin reading of
  3. Nonstandard spelling of .
  4. Nonstandard spelling of .

Usage notesEdit

  • English transcriptions of Mandarin speech often fail to distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without the appropriate indication of tone.

Middle EnglishEdit

AdverbEdit

ne

  1. not

ConjunctionEdit

ne

  1. nor

NegerhollandsEdit

VerbEdit

ne

  1. take

ReferencesEdit


Old EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Proto-Germanic *ne (not)

AdverbEdit

ne

  1. not

Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin nec.

ParticleEdit

ne

  1. not; used to form negative constructions

DescendantsEdit

  • French: ne

DeterminerEdit

ne

  1. neither (not one or the other)

DescendantsEdit

  • French: ni

Old SaxonEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *ne.

AdverbEdit

ne

  1. not

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin nīs, from nos.

Alternative formsEdit

  • нє (pre-1860s Cyrillic form)

PronounEdit

ne (accusative, reflexive or unstressed dative form of noi)

  1. us
    El ne urmează.
    He's following us.

See alsoEdit


Serbo-CroatianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *ne, from Proto-Indo-European *ne.

PronunciationEdit

ParticleEdit

ne (Cyrillic spelling не)

  1. not (denoting negation)
    ne znam — I don't know
    on je ne samo darovit, već i jako marljiv — he is not only talented, but also very industrious
    ht(j)eo-ne ht(j)eo — whether you want it or not
    da ne spavaš? / ne spavaš li? / zar ne spavaš? — aren't you sleeping?
    ne mogu, a da ne.. — I cannot but...
    reći ne — to say no; refuse, decline
    ne manje nego/od.. — no less then..
    ne doći — to fail to come, not come
    .... Zar ne? — ... Aren't you? (Do you?, Don't you?)
    "ne ću" — I won't

InterjectionEdit

ne (Cyrillic spelling не)

  1. no
    Jesi li demokrat(a)? Ne! — Are you a democrat? No!

SynonymsEdit

  • jok (dialectal)

AntonymsEdit


SloveneEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *ne, from Proto-Indo-European *ne.

PronunciationEdit

ParticleEdit

  1. not (negates meaning of verb)
  2. no (expresses disapproval, disagreement)

AntonymsEdit


TurkishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Turkic ne, from Proto-Turkic.

AdverbEdit

ne

  1. what

ConjunctionEdit

ne

  1. neither, nor

NounEdit

ne

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter N/n.

See alsoEdit


TuvaluanEdit

ParticleEdit

ne

  1. past tense marker, inserted immediately before the relevant verb

Yup'ikEdit

NounEdit

ne, ena (absolutive case)

  1. house
Last modified on 29 March 2014, at 03:05