Last modified on 9 July 2014, at 07:02

take away

EnglishEdit

VerbEdit

take away

  1. To remove something and put it in a different place.
    Mother took our plates away and came back with some fruit for us to eat.
  2. To remove something, either material or abstract, so that a person no longer has it.
    The teacher took my mobile phone away until the end of the lesson.
    The new law will take away some important rights from immigrant residents.
  3. To subtract or diminish something.
    If I have five apples and you take away two, how many do I have left?
    • 2011 January 22, Ian Hughes, “Arsenal 3 - 0 Wigan”, BBC:
      But take nothing away from Arsenal, who were driven on by the brilliance of Van Persie and Fabregas and only prevented from being out of sight at half-time by the feats of Al Habsi.
  4. To leave a memory or impression in one's mind that you think about later.
    I took away the impression that the play was under rehearsed.
  5. (of a person) To make someone leave a place and go somewhere else. Usually not with the person's consent.
    The police took him away for questioning.
    I'm taking you away to the country for a rest. It's for your own good!
  6. (of a person) To prevent, or limit, someone from being somewhere, or from doing something.
    My job takes me away from home most weekends.
    Using the internet so much can take you away from your studies.

Usage notesEdit

All senses are transitive and the object may appear before or after the particle. If the object is a pronoun, then it must be before the particle.

SynonymsEdit

See alsoEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

PrepositionEdit

take away

  1. minus
    Five take away two is three. (5 - 2 = 3)

See alsoEdit