See also: цяр

BelarusianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old East Slavic цьсарь (cĭsarĭ), from Old Church Slavonic цѣсарь (cěsarĭ), from a Germanic language, from Proto-Germanic *kaisaraz, from the Latin name Caesar.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [t͡sar]
  • (file)

NounEdit

цар (carm anim (genitive цара́, nominative plural цары́)

  1. king
  2. emperor

DeclensionEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • цар” in Belarusian-Russian dictionaries and Belarusian dictionaries at slounik.org

BulgarianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Church Slavonic цѣсарь (cěsarĭ), from Proto-Slavic *cěsařь, from a Germanic language, from Proto-Germanic *kaisaraz, from Latin Caesar.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

цар (carm (feminine цари́ца, related adjective ца́рски)

  1. czar, tsar, tzar
  2. king, ruler, monarch
  3. emperor
  4. sire
  5. (chess) king

DeclensionEdit

Related termsEdit


IngushEdit

PronounEdit

цар (car)

  1. (possessive) their
  2. tsar

MacedonianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Church Slavonic цѣсарь (cěsarĭ), from Proto-Slavic *cěsařь, from a Germanic language, from Proto-Germanic *kaisaraz, from Latin Caesar.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

цар (carm

  1. czar, tsar, tzar
  2. king, ruler, monarch
  3. emperor
  4. sire
  5. Caesar
  6. (slang) a cool or intelligent person (used to indicate admiration or high approval)

DeclensionEdit


Serbo-CroatianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *cěsařь, *cьsarь, from a Germanic language, from Proto-Germanic *kaisaraz, from Latin Caesar.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ца̏р m (Latin spelling cȁr)

  1. czar, emperor, monarch

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit


UkrainianEdit

 
Ukrainian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia uk

EtymologyEdit

From Old East Slavic цьсарь (cĭsarĭ), from Proto-Slavic *cěsařь, from a Germanic language, from Proto-Germanic *kaisaraz, from Latin Caesar.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

цар (carm pers (genitive царя́, nominative plural царі́, genitive plural царі́в)

  1. king
  2. emperor

DeclensionEdit

ReferencesEdit