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East Central GermanEdit

NounEdit

Dag

  1. (Upper Saxony) day

German Low GermanEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Saxon dag, from Proto-Germanic *dagaz, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰegʷʰ- (to burn). Cognate to German Tag.

NounEdit

Dag m (plural Daag' or Daag or Daog or Doage or Doag' or Doag or Dạg' or Dag' or Dag)

  1. (in many dialects, including Low Prussian) day

Derived termsEdit

NounEdit

Dag m

  1. dative singular of Dach
  2. plural of Dach

LuxembourgishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle High German dach, from Old High German *dag, northern variant of tag, from Proto-Germanic *dagaz. The plural Deeg is derived from the singular with a secondary umlaut. But compare Do, the regular outcome of the older plural and dative singular. Cognate with German Tag, Dutch dag, English day, Icelandic dagur.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

Dag m (plural Deeg)

  1. day

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit


NorwegianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse dagr (day), with identical meaning in modern Norwegian.

Proper nounEdit

Dag

  1. A male given name.

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Kristoffer Kruken - Ola Stemshaug: Norsk personnamnleksikon, Det Norske Samlaget, Oslo 1995, →ISBN
  • [1] Statistisk sentralbyrå, Namnestatistikk: 9 774 males with the given name Dag living in Norway on January 1st 2011, with the frequency peak in the 1960s. Accessed on 19 May, 2011.

Pennsylvania GermanEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Compare German Tag, Dutch dag, English day.

NounEdit

Dag m (plural Dag or Dage)

  1. Alternative form of Daag

SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse dagr (day), with identical meaning in modern Swedish. A runic name revived since 1863.

Proper nounEdit

Dag c (genitive Dags)

  1. A male given name.

Related termsEdit