See also: Tag, TAG, tag-, tağ, tág, tåg, and tāğ

English edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Middle English tagge (small piece hanging from a garment), probably of North Germanic origin. Compare Norwegian tagg (point; prong; barb; tag), Swedish tagg (thorn; prickle; tine), Icelandic tág (a willow-twig). Compare also tack.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

tag (plural tags)

  1. A small label.
  2. (playground games, uncountable) A children's chasing game in which one player (known as "it") attempts to touch another, who then becomes "it".
  3. A skin tag, an excrescence of skin.
  4. A type of cardboard.
  5. Graffiti in the form of a stylized signature particular to the artist.
    • 2011, Scape Martinez, Graff 2: Next Level Graffiti Techniques, page 124:
      There is a hierarchy of sorts: a throw-up can go over a tag, a piece over a throw-up, and a burner over a piece.
  6. A dangling lock of sheep's wool, matted with dung; a dung tag.
  7. (informal, authorship) An attribution in narrated dialogue (eg, "he said") or attributed words (e.g. "he thought").
    Synonyms: dialogue tag, speech tag, tag line
    • (Can we date this quote?), michael, alt.fiction.original[1] (Usenet):
      Seems here like Russ would be speaking. You could use a tag here.
    • (Can we date this quote?), Jane MacDonald, alt.fiction.original[2] (Usenet):
      If you want to start with talk, stick a tag in right away
    • (Can we date this quote?), bart_...@hotmail.com, alt.fiction.original[3] (Usenet):
      You could combine these two paragraphs, I think, and rewrite to lose the tag portion of the third sentence.
  8. (music) The last line (or last two lines) of a song's chorus that is repeated to indicate the end of the song.
  9. (television) The last scene of a TV program, often focusing on the program's subplot.
    Antonym: cold open
    • 2006, Stephen V. Duncan, A Guide to Screenwriting Success, page 300:
      Often, the tag punctuates the "we're all in this together" theme and is topped with a laugh.
  10. (chiefly US) A vehicle number plate; a medal bearing identification data (animals, soldiers).
    The subwoofer in the trunk was so loud, it vibrated the tag like an aluminum can.
  11. (baseball) An instance of touching the baserunner with the ball or the ball in a gloved hand to rule him "out."
    The tag was applied at second for the final out.
  12. (computing) A piece of markup representing an element in a markup language.
    The <title> tag provides a title for the Web page.
    The <sarcasm> tag conveys sarcasm in Internet slang.
  13. (computing) A keyword, term, or phrase associated with or assigned to data, media, and/or information enabling keyword-based classification; often used to categorize content.
    I want to add genre and artist tags to the files in my music collection.
  14. Any slight appendage, as to an article of dress; something slight hanging loosely.
  15. A metallic binding, tube, or point, at the end of a string, or lace, to stiffen it.
  16. The end, or catchword, of an actor's speech; cue.
  17. Something mean and paltry; the rabble.
    • 1596 (date written; published 1633), Edmund Spenser, A Vewe of the Present State of Irelande [], Dublin: [] Societie of Stationers, [], →OCLC; republished as A View of the State of Ireland [] (Ancient Irish Histories), Dublin: [] Society of Stationers, [] Hibernia Press, [] [b]y John Morrison, 1809, →OCLC:
      For upon the like Proclamation there, they all came in, both tag and rag
  18. A sheep in its first year.
    • 1807, The Complete Farmer, or, General Dictionary of Agriculture and Husbandry, →OCLC:
      After being weaned, the ram or wedder lamb is sometimes termed hog, hoggit, or tag, during the whole of the first year
  19. (biochemistry) Any short peptide sequence artificially attached to proteins mostly in order to help purify, solubilize or visualize these proteins.
  20. (slang) A person's name.
    What’s your tag?
Hyponyms edit
Derived terms edit
Translations edit
See also edit

(children's game to avoid being "it"):

Verb edit

tag (third-person singular simple present tags, present participle tagging, simple past and past participle tagged)

  1. (transitive) To label (something).
  2. (transitive) To mark (something) with one's graffiti tag.
  3. (transitive) To remove dung tags from a sheep.
    Regularly tag the rear ends of your sheep.
  4. (transitive, baseball, colloquial) To hit the ball hard.
    He really tagged that ball.
  5. (transitive, vulgar, slang, 1990s) to have sex with someone (especially a man of a woman)
    Steve is dying to tag Angie from chemistry class.
  6. (transitive, baseball) To put a runner out by touching them with the ball or the ball in a gloved hand.
    He tagged the runner for the out.
  7. (transitive, computing) To mark with a tag (metadata for classification).
    Antonym: untag
    I am tagging my music files by artist and genre.
  8. (transitive, Internet) To attach the name of (a user) to a posted message so that they are linked from the post and possibly sent a notification.
    • 2021, Julie B. Wiest, Theorizing Criminality and Policing in the Digital Media Age, page 82:
      One side wants to demonstrate a higher level of street knowledge and openly denounces the distorting lens of Instagram dissings; the other embraces the medium's branding affordances by sending “clout” to a third-party ally, while at the same time avoiding tagging the opponent.
  9. To follow closely, accompany, tag along.
    • 1906 April, O. Henry [pseudonym; William Sydney Porter], “By Courier”, in The Four Million, New York, N.Y.: McClure, Phillips & Co, →OCLC:
      A tall young man came striding through the park along the path near which she sat. Behind him tagged a boy carrying a suit-case.
  10. (transitive) To catch and touch (a player in the game of tag).
  11. (transitive) To fit with, or as if with, a tag or tags.
  12. To fasten; to attach.
Derived terms edit
Translations edit

Etymology 2 edit

Borrowed from Aramaicתגא(taga, crown). Doublet of taj.

Noun edit

tag (plural tagin)

  1. A decoration drawn over some Hebrew letters in Jewish scrolls.

References edit

  • tag”, in OneLook Dictionary Search.

Further reading edit

Anagrams edit

Cimbrian edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Middle High German tag, tac, from Old High German tag, tac, from Proto-West Germanic *dag, from Proto-Germanic *dagaz. Cognate with German Tag, English day.

Noun edit

tag m (plural taaghe)

  1. (Sette Comuni) day

Declension edit

Related terms edit

References edit

  • “tag” in Martalar, Umberto Martello; Bellotto, Alfonso (1974) Dizionario della lingua Cimbra dei Sette Communi vicentini, 1st edition, Roana, Italy: Instituto di Cultura Cimbra A. Dal Pozzo

Crimean Gothic edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Germanic *dagaz, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰegʷʰ- (to burn).

Noun edit

tag

  1. day
    • 1562, Ogier Ghiselin de Busbecq, (Please provide the book title or journal name):
      Tag. Dies.
      (please add an English translation of this quotation)

Derived terms edit

Danish edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Old Norse þak (thatch, roof), from Proto-Germanic *þaką, cognate with Swedish tak, English thack, thatch, German Dach, Dutch dak.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /taːˀɣ/, [ˈtˢæˀ(j)]

Noun edit

tag n (singular definite taget, plural indefinite tage)

  1. roof
Declension edit
Derived terms edit
Related terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

From Old Norse tak (hold, grasp), cognate with Norwegian tak, Swedish tag. Derived from the verb taka (Danish tage).

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ta(ːˀ)ɣ/, [ˈtˢæˀ(j)], [ˈtˢɑw]

Noun edit

tag n (singular definite taget, plural indefinite tag)

  1. hold, grasp, grip
  2. stroke (with an oar or with the armes in the water)
  3. handling, control
Declension edit

Etymology 3 edit

Borrowed from English tag (since 1985).

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /taɡ/, [ˈtˢæɡ̊]

Noun edit

tag n (singular definite tagget, plural indefinite tags)

  1. tag (signature of a graffiti artist)
  2. (computing) tag (markup in an electronic file)
Declension edit

Etymology 4 edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ta(ːˀ)/, [ˈtˢæ(ˀ)]

Verb edit

tag

  1. imperative of tage

Dutch edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from English tag.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

tag n (plural tags, diminutive tagje n)

  1. tag

Finnish edit

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈtɑɡ/, [ˈt̪ɑ̝ɡ]
  • Rhymes: -ɑɡ
  • Syllabification(key): tag

Noun edit

tag

  1. Alternative form of tagi

Declension edit

Inflection of tag (Kotus type 5/risti, no gradation)
nominative tag tagit
genitive tagin tagien
partitive tagia tageja
illative tagiin tageihin
singular plural
nominative tag tagit
accusative nom. tag tagit
gen. tagin
genitive tagin tagien
partitive tagia tageja
inessive tagissa tageissa
elative tagista tageista
illative tagiin tageihin
adessive tagilla tageilla
ablative tagilta tageilta
allative tagille tageille
essive tagina tageina
translative tagiksi tageiksi
abessive tagitta tageitta
instructive tagein
comitative See the possessive forms below.
Possessive forms of tag (Kotus type 5/risti, no gradation)
first-person singular possessor
singular plural
nominative tagini tagini
accusative nom. tagini tagini
gen. tagini
genitive tagini tagieni
partitive tagiani tagejani
inessive tagissani tageissani
elative tagistani tageistani
illative tagiini tageihini
adessive tagillani tageillani
ablative tagiltani tageiltani
allative tagilleni tageilleni
essive taginani tageinani
translative tagikseni tageikseni
abessive tagittani tageittani
instructive
comitative tageineni
second-person singular possessor
singular plural
nominative tagisi tagisi
accusative nom. tagisi tagisi
gen. tagisi
genitive tagisi tagiesi
partitive tagiasi tagejasi
inessive tagissasi tageissasi
elative tagistasi tageistasi
illative tagiisi tageihisi
adessive tagillasi tageillasi
ablative tagiltasi tageiltasi
allative tagillesi tageillesi
essive taginasi tageinasi
translative tagiksesi tageiksesi
abessive tagittasi tageittasi
instructive
comitative tageinesi
first-person plural possessor
singular plural
nominative tagimme tagimme
accusative nom. tagimme tagimme
gen. tagimme
genitive tagimme tagiemme
partitive tagiamme tagejamme
inessive tagissamme tageissamme
elative tagistamme tageistamme
illative tagiimme tageihimme
adessive tagillamme tageillamme
ablative tagiltamme tageiltamme
allative tagillemme tageillemme
essive taginamme tageinamme
translative tagiksemme tageiksemme
abessive tagittamme tageittamme
instructive
comitative tageinemme
second-person plural possessor
singular plural
nominative taginne taginne
accusative nom. taginne taginne
gen. taginne
genitive taginne tagienne
partitive tagianne tagejanne
inessive tagissanne tageissanne
elative tagistanne tageistanne
illative tagiinne tageihinne
adessive tagillanne tageillanne
ablative tagiltanne tageiltanne
allative tagillenne tageillenne
essive taginanne tageinanne
translative tagiksenne tageiksenne
abessive tagittanne tageittanne
instructive
comitative tageinenne
third-person possessor
singular plural
nominative taginsa taginsa
accusative nom. taginsa taginsa
gen. taginsa
genitive taginsa tagiensa
partitive tagiaan
tagiansa
tagejaan
tagejansa
inessive tagissaan
tagissansa
tageissaan
tageissansa
elative tagistaan
tagistansa
tageistaan
tageistansa
illative tagiinsa tageihinsa
adessive tagillaan
tagillansa
tageillaan
tageillansa
ablative tagiltaan
tagiltansa
tageiltaan
tageiltansa
allative tagilleen
tagillensa
tageilleen
tageillensa
essive taginaan
taginansa
tageinaan
tageinansa
translative tagikseen
tagiksensa
tageikseen
tageiksensa
abessive tagittaan
tagittansa
tageittaan
tageittansa
instructive
comitative tageineen
tageinensa

Further reading edit

French edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from English tag.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

tag m (plural tags)

  1. tag

German edit

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

tag

  1. singular imperative of tagen

Hungarian edit

Etymology 1 edit

Of unknown origin.[1]

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

tag (plural tagok)

  1. member
  2. Synonym of végtag (limb)
Declension edit
Inflection (stem in -o-, back harmony)
singular plural
nominative tag tagok
accusative tagot tagokat
dative tagnak tagoknak
instrumental taggal tagokkal
causal-final tagért tagokért
translative taggá tagokká
terminative tagig tagokig
essive-formal tagként tagokként
essive-modal tagul
inessive tagban tagokban
superessive tagon tagokon
adessive tagnál tagoknál
illative tagba tagokba
sublative tagra tagokra
allative taghoz tagokhoz
elative tagból tagokból
delative tagról tagokról
ablative tagtól tagoktól
non-attributive
possessive - singular
tagé tagoké
non-attributive
possessive - plural
tagéi tagokéi
Possessive forms of tag
possessor single possession multiple possessions
1st person sing. tagom tagjaim
2nd person sing. tagod tagjaid
3rd person sing. tagja tagjai
1st person plural tagunk tagjaink
2nd person plural tagotok tagjaitok
3rd person plural tagjuk tagjaik
Derived terms edit
Compound words
Expressions

Etymology 2 edit

Borrowed from English tag (piece of markup).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

tag (plural tagek)

  1. (computing) tag (a piece of markup representing an element in a markup language)
Declension edit
Inflection (stem in -e-, front unrounded harmony)
singular plural
nominative tag tagek
accusative taget tageket
dative tagnek tageknek
instrumental taggel tagekkel
causal-final tagért tagekért
translative taggé tagekké
terminative tagig tagekig
essive-formal tagként tagekként
essive-modal
inessive tagben tagekben
superessive tagen tageken
adessive tagnél tageknél
illative tagbe tagekbe
sublative tagre tagekre
allative taghez tagekhez
elative tagből tagekből
delative tagről tagekről
ablative tagtől tagektől
non-attributive
possessive - singular
tagé tageké
non-attributive
possessive - plural
tagéi tagekéi
Possessive forms of tag
possessor single possession multiple possessions
1st person sing. tagem tagjeim
2nd person sing. taged tagjeid
3rd person sing. tagje tagjei
1st person plural tagünk tagjeink
2nd person plural tagetek tagjeitek
3rd person plural tagjük tagjeik

Etymology 3 edit

Borrowed from English tag (a piece of graffiti).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

tag (plural tagek)

  1. tag (graffiti in the form of a stylized signature particular to the artist)
Declension edit
Inflection (stem in -e-, front unrounded harmony)
singular plural
nominative tag tagek
accusative taget tageket
dative tagnek tageknek
instrumental taggel tagekkel
causal-final tagért tagekért
translative taggé tagekké
terminative tagig tagekig
essive-formal tagként tagekként
essive-modal
inessive tagben tagekben
superessive tagen tageken
adessive tagnél tageknél
illative tagbe tagekbe
sublative tagre tagekre
allative taghez tagekhez
elative tagből tagekből
delative tagről tagekről
ablative tagtől tagektől
non-attributive
possessive - singular
tagé tageké
non-attributive
possessive - plural
tagéi tagekéi
Possessive forms of tag
possessor single possession multiple possessions
1st person sing. tagem tagjeim
2nd person sing. taged tagjeid
3rd person sing. tagje tagjei
1st person plural tagünk tagjeink
2nd person plural tagetek tagjeitek
3rd person plural tagjük tagjeik

References edit

  1. ^ tag in Zaicz, Gábor (ed.). Etimológiai szótár: Magyar szavak és toldalékok eredete (‘Dictionary of Etymology: The origin of Hungarian words and affixes’). Budapest: Tinta Könyvkiadó, 2006, →ISBN.  (See also its 2nd edition.)

Further reading edit

  • tag in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh. A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (‘The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’, abbr.: ÉrtSz.). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962. Fifth ed., 1992: →ISBN

Meriam edit

Noun edit

tag

  1. arm, hand

Middle High German edit

Noun edit

tag m

  1. Alternative form of tac

Declension edit

Old High German edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-West Germanic *dag, from Proto-Germanic *dagaz, whence also Old English dæġ, Old Norse dagr, Old Dutch and Old Saxon dag, Old High German tag, Gothic 𐌳𐌰𐌲𐍃 (dags). Ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *dʰegʷʰ- (to burn).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

tag m (plural taga)

  1. day
    tag after tage
    day after day

Declension edit

Derived terms edit

Descendants edit

References edit

  • Joseph Wright, An Old High German Primer

Polish edit

 
Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

Etymology edit

Borrowed from English tag.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

tag m inan

  1. (computing) tag (piece of markup representing an element in a markup language)
    Synonym: znacznik

Declension edit

Further reading edit

  • tag in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • tag in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Portuguese edit

Etymology edit

Unadapted borrowing from English tag.

Pronunciation edit

 
  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /ˈta.ɡi/, /ˈtɛ.ɡi/
    • (Southern Brazil) IPA(key): /ˈta.ɡe/, /ˈtɛ.ɡe/
  • (Portugal) IPA(key): /ˈta.ɡɨ/ [ˈta.ɣɨ], /ˈtɛ.ɡɨ/ [ˈtɛ.ɣɨ]

Noun edit

tag f or m (plural tags)

  1. tag (type of graffiti)
  2. an RFID chip, especially one used to unlock electronic door locks, often carried as a key fob
  3. (computing) tag (a markup instruction)

Sumerian edit

Romanization edit

tag

  1. Romanization of 𒋳 (tag)

Swedish edit

Etymology edit

From Old Norse tak.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

tag n

  1. a grip; a hold (of something)
    Tappa inte taget
    Don’t lose your grip
    Släpp inte taget!
    Don’t let go!
    ta tag i något
    grab something ("take grip in something")
  2. (figuratively, in "ta tag i (något)") to get down to dealing with (something)
  3. a stroke (with oars or an oar, a paddle, or the like; in swimming)
    ett tag till med åran
    one more stroke with the oar
    ta ett årtag
    take a stroke with oars (or an oar)
    ta ett paddeltag
    take a stroke with a paddle
  4. a while (limited, often short time period)
    Hon kommer om ett tag
    She will be here in a while
    Det kommer ta ett bra tag
    It will take a good while
    ett litet tag
    a little while
  5. a manner of doing something (can be thought of as "grips" as a metaphor for how one goes about something)
    en maskin som tål tuffa tag
    a machine that can take a beating ("that can stand tough grips")
    friska tag
    spunk, vigor ("fresh grips")
    Somliga gillar hårda tag
    Some like it rough

Declension edit

Declension of tag 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative tag taget tag tagen
Genitive tags tagets tags tagens

Derived terms edit

See also edit

Verb edit

tag

  1. imperative of taga

Alternative forms edit

References edit

Anagrams edit

Welsh edit

Etymology edit

Back-formation from tagu (to strangle, to choke).

Noun edit

tag m (plural tagau or tagion)

  1. choking, suffocation

Derived terms edit

  • llindag (suffocation; snare; dodder; thrush)
  • tagaradr (restharrow)
  • tagell (gill; jowl)
  • tagfa (choking, throttling; bottleneck)
  • taglys (bindweed)

Mutation edit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
tag dag nhag thag
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading edit

  • R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950–present), “tag”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies