English edit

Etymology 1 edit

Proper noun edit

Gen

  1. A Niger-Congo language of Togo.

Further reading edit

Etymology 2 edit

Shortened from new generation, from Italian generazione nuova.

Noun edit

Gen (plural Gens)

  1. (Roman Catholicism) A member of the Gen Movement, a youth expression of the international Focolare Movement.

Etymology 3 edit

Pronunciation edit

Proper noun edit

Gen

  1. A female given name, a short form of Genevieve.
    • 1894, Harper's Young People, page 208:
      Hal. Oh, don't fuss, Gen. I'll do my part all right. Mamma's 'structed me, you know.
      Genevieve. Instructed, Hal.
    • 2017, Emma G Prince, The Silent Life of Genevieve, →ISBN:
      Gen? Listen, I'm so sorry I did that, Gen. You gotta believe me. I'm not like this and you know it.” “Listen...Kyle, I...I don't think I want to see you anymore.” Genevieve's voice cracked. “Gen!”

Etymology 4 edit

Noun edit

Gen (plural Gens)

  1. Alternative form of Gen. (General)
    • 2023 August 26, Dan Sabbagh, “‘That’s our guy’: how UK military chief became key Nato liaison in Ukraine”, in The Guardian[1], →ISSN:
      Particularly notable was the presence not just of Nato’s military chief, the American Gen Christopher Cavoli, but also Adm Sir Tony Radakin, Britain’s most senior military officer, who is now acknowledged in Washington and Kyiv as an increasingly important actor in helping Ukraine overcome the Russian invaders.

Anagrams edit

German edit

Etymology edit

Coined by Danish biologist Wilhelm Johannsen in 1909, from Ancient Greek γενεά (geneá, generation, descent).

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈɡeːn/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -eːn

Noun edit

Gen n (strong, genitive Gens, plural Gene)

  1. gene

Declension edit

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

Further reading edit

  • Gen” in Duden online
  • Gen” in Digitales Wörterbuch der deutschen Sprache