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EtymologyEdit

From Middle High German gift f (gift, something given), Old High German gift f (gift), from Proto-Germanic *giftiz, which is a derivation of *gebaną (to give). Cognate with English gift.[1]

The word has been used as a euphemism for "poison" since Old High German, influenced by Late Latin dosis (dose), from Ancient Greek δόσις (dósis, something given; dose of medicine). The original meaning "gift" has disappeared in contemporary Standard German, but see Mitgift. Compare also Dutch gift (gift) alongside gif (poison).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ɡɪft/
  • Rhymes: -ɪft
  • (file)

NounEdit

Gift n (genitive Gifts or Giftes, plural Gifte)

  1. poison; toxin; venom
    • 2010, Der Spiegel, issue 31/2010, page 49:
      Der Mann ist Toxikologe, ein Experte für Gift. Er arbeitet für ein Pharma-Unternehmen.
      The man is a toxicologist, an expert on poison. He works for a pharmaceutical business.

Usage notesEdit

  • While the word is neuter in contemporary German, it may also occasionally be masculine in older texts.

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

NounEdit

Gift f (genitive Gift, plural Giften)

  1. (obsolete) gift; something given

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Danish: gift (poison)
  • Saterland Frisian: Gift

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Kluge, Friedrich (1989), “Gift”, in Elmar Seebold, editor, Etymologisches Wörterbuch der deutschen Sprache [Etymological dictionary of the German language] (in German), 22nd edition, →ISBN

Further readingEdit

  • Gift in Duden online
  • Gift in Duden online
  • Gift” in Digitales Wörterbuch der deutschen Sprache

HunsrikEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

Gift n (plural Gifte)

  1. poison
    Sie hod Gift genomm.
    She took poison.
    Bass uff, das is Gift.
    Beware, this is poison.

Further readingEdit


Pennsylvania GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

Compare German Gift, Dutch gif.

NounEdit

Gift n

  1. poison
  2. poison ivy, ivy poisoning