EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

From Middle English poisoun, poyson, poysone, puyson, puisun, from Old French puison, poison, from Latin pōtio, pōtiōnis (drink, a draught, a poisonous draught, a potion), from pōtō (I drink). Displaced native Old English ātor. See also potion and potable.

PronunciationEdit

  • enPR: poi'zən, IPA(key): /ˈpɔɪz(ə)n/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɔɪzən
  • Hyphenation: poi‧son

NounEdit

poison (countable and uncountable, plural poisons)

  1. A substance that is harmful or lethal to a living organism when ingested.
    We used a poison to kill the weeds.
  2. Something that harms a person or thing.
    Gossip is a malicious poison.
  3. (informal) An intoxicating drink; a liquor. (note: this sense is chiefly encountered in the phrases "name your poison" and "what's your poison ?")
    — What's your poison?
    — I'll have a glass of whisky.
  4. (chemistry) Any substance that inhibits catalytic activity.
    • 2013, Huazhang Liu, Ammonia Synthesis Catalysts: Innovation and Practice (page 693)
      The temperature effect of poisons. The influence of poison on the catalyst can be different with the change of reaction conditions.

Usage notesEdit

  • Not to be confused with venom

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

poison (third-person singular simple present poisons, present participle poisoning, simple past and past participle poisoned)

  1. (transitive) To use poison to kill or paralyse (somebody).
    The assassin poisoned the king.
  2. (transitive) To pollute; to cause to become poisonous.
    That factory is poisoning the river.
  3. (transitive) To cause to become much worse.
    Suspicion will poison their relationship.
    He poisoned the mood in the room with his non-stop criticism.
  4. (transitive) To cause (someone) to hate or to have unfair negative opinions.
    She's poisoned him against all his old friends.
  5. (chemistry) To inhibit the catalytic activity of.
  6. (transitive, computing) To place false information into (a cache) as part of an exploit.
    • 2013, Ronald L. Mendell, Investigating Information-based Crimes (page 93)
      In this technique, the hacker poisons the cache to launch malware into Web pages.

Usage notesEdit

SynonymsEdit

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FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French, inherited from Latin pōtio, pōtiōnem. Doublet of potion, a borrowing.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

poison m (plural poisons)

  1. poison
    Poisson sans boisson est poison.Fish without drink is poison.

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

NounEdit

poison

  1. Alternative form of poisoun

Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin pōtiōnem, accusative singular of pōtio.

NounEdit

poison f (oblique plural poisons, nominative singular poison, nominative plural poisons)

  1. poison
  2. potion

DescendantsEdit

  • Middle English: poisoun
  • French: poison

SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French poison. Doublet of poción.

NounEdit

poison m (plural póisones)

  1. (Louisiana) poison