See also: raj and ráj

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Proprialisation of raj ((India) reign, rule, noun), borrowed from Hindustani राज / راج(rāj, reign, rule; empire, kingdom; country, state; royalty), from Sanskrit राज्य (rājyá, empire, kingdom, realm; kingship, royalty, sovereignty; country), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *h₃reǵ- (to right or straighten oneself; to govern, rule; just; right).[1]

PronunciationEdit

Proper nounEdit

Raj (historical)

  1. Short for British Raj; the period of colonial rule of the Indian subcontinent by the British Empire between 1858 and 1947.
    Synonym: British India
    during the Raj
  2. (proscribed) The whole period of British influence or rule in the Indian subcontinent from the 1600s to 1947.

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

Raj (plural Rajes)

  1. (by extension from the proper noun) A system of government where authority is exercised by a specific group.
    • 1965, New Race[1], volume 1:
      After Gandhiji's Ram Raj, which lived and went with him to the wilderness, it was Goonda Raj everywhere[...]There was nothing that the goonda did not manpiulate. He turned community development blocks into chips of self-aggrandisement. Panchyat Raj was the Pentagon of Goonda Raj.
    • 1999, Ronald J. Herring, Meredith Jung-En Woo, editor, The Developmental State, →ISBN, page 310:
      Concern that the license - permit quota raj was stifling growth focused on the drop in the rate of growth in industry after 1965...

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Compare “raj, n.”, in OED Online  , Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, December 2020; “Raj, n.”, in Lexico, Dictionary.com; Oxford University Press, 2019–present.

AnagramsEdit