Talk:faggot

another meaning for this utterly vile wordEdit

Is "faggot" also synonymous with "pussy"?

I don't know who signed the above (use four tildes (~) to whomever did so), but I wonder if there is a meaning for "faggot" able to be verified to mean, in essence, "a male who makes unwanted passes at other men, whether their target is a homosexual or heterosexual"? [[Briguy52748 02:04, 16 August 2007 (UTC)]]

RfV sense, packet of cigarettesEdit

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faggot - pack of cigarettesEdit

A pack of cigarettes? - cites please.--Williamsayers79 08:54, 6 October 2006 (UTC)

Confusion with UK "fag" (a cigarette) perhaps? — Paul G 09:12, 10 October 2006 (UTC)
I think so, If we don't get any cites I reckon it would be a safe bet to remove this sense.--Williamsayers79 07:37, 11 October 2006 (UTC)
No cites, quotes, references given so I'll apply the {{rfvResult}} to the talk page until someone finds any evidence.--Williamsayers79 13:26, 10 November 2006 (UTC)


It does mean cigarette though! How can no one find a source for that??? —This comment was unsigned.

You mean a "fag" not a "faggot," right? --Connel MacKenzie 01:49, 9 October 2007 (UTC)
I believe you mean a "fag" too. I assume you are making some attempt a silly practial joke or are you serious? No cites, no inclusion I'm afraid.--Williamsayers79 11:11, 9 October 2007 (UTC)

anonEdit

Faggot: Arguably the term Faggot meaning "an unpleasant woman" (circa 1591) predates the definition of a homosexual man (circa 1914) by a number of centuries.

http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?search=faggot Other evidence of this definition can be found in the Oxford English Dictionary. (Including the Oxford Modern English Dictionary 1992,1995.) Also in: http://www.m-w.com/dictionary/faggot


There was an rfv on the meatball entry. This was ridiculous - it's a well known term in England. Evidence here http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/england/2698507.stm

Looks like it got added back but lacks a quote, perhaps one from that 2003 article could be used? 64.228.90.179 16:39, 10 November 2015 (UTC)

To GatherEdit

I was just reading a translation of Montaigne's Of the Resemblance of Children to Their Fathers and he uses the term faggoting to describe "gathering": "This faggoting up of so many divers pieces is so done that I never set pen to paper...". I'm having trouble finding another source, unless Montaigne means a verb akin to the metalworking definition, but the use suggests that the noun element "bundle" is also a verb element of "to bundle". If whomever notices this can add the verb form, with the note that it is archaic. --TheGrza 19:25, 2 February 2009 (UTC)

Translation from what? Name sounds French. Only English is here, only verb refers to fagot#Verb which is about tying sticks not gathered people. Sounds interesting though, what year did OTROCTTF come out? 64.228.90.179 16:35, 10 November 2015 (UTC)

Add Irish/Scouse definition?Edit

'Faggot' is also a Irish and Scouse word meaning 'lazy person'. This is the word used in the Irish song 'Fairytale of New York' which caused controversy a few years ago due to British radio stations censoring it, believing it was using the American pejorative meaning. PabloDiablo 15:09, 12 August 2009 (UTC)

I can't find that sense. There is Irish use of the word as meaning a burdensome, worthless person (as an old woman), but not lazy. See Irish slang and [1]. Do you have any source beside the Pogues' lyrics? The lyrics make it clear that it is a term of abuse, but not much else. DCDuring TALK 11:07, 8 September 2009 (UTC)

faggotEdit

(pejorative, US, slang) A male homosexual. Not sure about the UK, but this sense is also heavily used in Australia. Tooironic 23:45, 16 December 2009 (UTC)

Fag slang: Smoke or cigaretteEdit

I was just watching Sons of Anarchy, and Trinity asked Jax if he had a fag, and he nodded and pulled out a pack of smokes. He was in Ireland, so this could just be a British/European thing, but it is a possible meaning.Shane2008 (talk) 07:26, 2 September 2013 (UTC)Shane2008

Joyce and LawrenceEdit

From EtymOnline:

the contemptuous slang word for "woman" (in common with the other possible sources or influences listed here) was in active use early 20c., by D.H. Lawrence and James Joyce, among others

Do not see quotes from them under def 4. Could we locate what works they use it this way in? Sounds like notable historicity. 64.228.90.179 16:42, 10 November 2015 (UTC)

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