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PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

  • First attested in 1677.
  • From Latin abrādō (scrape off), from ab (from, away from) + rādō (scrape).

VerbEdit

abrade (third-person singular simple present abrades, present participle abrading, simple past and past participle abraded)

  1. (transitive) To rub or wear off; erode. [First attested in the late 17th century.][1]
  2. (transitive) To wear down or exhaust, as a person; irritate. [First attested in the mid 18th century.][1]
  3. (transitive) To irritate by rubbing; chafe. [First attested in the mid 18th century.][1]
  4. (transitive) To cause the surface to become more rough.
  5. (intransitive) To undergo abrasion.
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

Etymology 2Edit

From Old English abraiden.

VerbEdit

abrade (third-person singular simple present abrades, present participle abrading, simple past and past participle abraded)

  1. (transitive) Obsolete spelling of abraid

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 “abrade” in Lesley Brown, editor-in-chief; William R. Trumble and Angus Stevenson, editors, The Shorter Oxford English Dictionary on Historical Principles, 5th edition, Oxford; New York, N.Y.: Oxford University Press, 2002, ISBN 978-0-19-860457-0, page 7.

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