chafe

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Middle English chaufen (to warm), from Old French chaufer (modern French chauffer), from Latin calefacere, calfacere (to make warm), from calere (to be warm) + facere (to make). See caldron.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

chafe (uncountable)

  1. Heat excited by friction.
  2. Injury or wear caused by friction.
  3. Vexation; irritation of mind; rage.
    • 1596, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, VI.5:
      Like a wylde Bull, that, being at a bay, / Is bayted of a mastiffe and a hound / […] That in his chauffe he digs the trampled ground / And threats his horns […].

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

chafe (third-person singular simple present chafes, present participle chafing, simple past and past participle chafed)

  1. (transitive) To excite heat in by friction; to rub in order to stimulate and make warm.
  2. (transitive) To excite passion or anger in; to fret; to irritate.
  3. (transitive) To fret and wear by rubbing; as, to chafe a cable.
  4. (intransitive) To rub; to come together so as to wear by rubbing; to wear by friction.
    • Shakespeare
      the troubled Tiber chafing with her shores
    • Longfellow
      made its great boughs chafe together
  5. (intransitive) To be worn by rubbing.
    A cable chafes.
  6. (intransitive) To have a feeling of vexation; to be vexed; to fret; to be irritated.
    • Shakespeare
      He will chafe at the doctor's marrying my daughter.
    • 1996, Jim Schiller , Developing Jepara in New Order Indonesia, page 58:
      Many local politicians chafed under the restrictions of Guided Democracy []

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit


SpanishEdit

VerbEdit

chafe

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of chafar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of chafar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of chafar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of chafar.
Last modified on 7 April 2014, at 10:12