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See also: Absinthium

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin absinthium, from Ancient Greek ἀψίνθιον (apsínthion).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

absinthium (uncountable)

  1. (now rare) The common wormwood (Artemisia absinthium), an intensely bitter herb used in the production of absinthe and vermouth, and as a tonic. [First attested around 1150 to 1350.][1]
  2. The dried leaves and flowering tops of the wormwood plant.[2]
  3. absinthe oil

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ “absinthium” in Lesley Brown, editor, The Shorter Oxford English Dictionary, 5th edition, Oxford: Oxford University Press, →ISBN, page 9.
  2. ^ Philip Babcock Gove (editor), Webster's Third International Dictionary of the English Language, Unabridged (G. & C. Merriam Co., 1976 [1909], →ISBN), page 5

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Ancient Greek ἀψίνθιον (apsínthion, wormwood).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

absinthium n (genitive absinthiī or absinthī); second declension

  1. wormwood
  2. an infusion of wormwood sometimes masked with honey due to its bitter taste
  3. (figuratively) something which is bitter but wholesome
    • c. 95 CE, Quintilian, Institutio Oratoria 3.1.5:
      Sed nos veremur ne parum hic liber mellis et absinthii multum habere videatur
      But I fear that this book will have too little sweetness and too much wormwood.
  4. accusative singular of absinthium
  5. vocative singular of absinthium

InflectionEdit

Second declension.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative absinthium absinthia
Genitive absinthiī
absinthī1
absinthiōrum
Dative absinthiō absinthiīs
Accusative absinthium absinthia
Ablative absinthiō absinthiīs
Vocative absinthium absinthia

1Found in older Latin (until the Augustan Age).

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit