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An acrimonious argument

acrimony +‎ -ous;[1] compare French acrimonieux (acrimonious), from Latin ācrimōniōsus (acrimonious), from ācrimōnia (pungency, sharpness; acrimony, austerity) + -ōsus (suffix meaning ‘full of; prone to’, forming adjectives from nouns) (ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *-went- or *-wont- + *-to-). Ācrimōnia is derived from Latin ācer (sharp; bitter, sour) (from Proto-Indo-European *h₂ḱrós (sharp), from *h₂eḱ- (sharp) + *-rós (suffix forming adjectives from Caland system roots)) + Latin -mōnia (the feminine form of -mōnium (suffix forming collective nouns and nouns designating legal status or obligation), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *-mō (suffix forming agent nouns from verbs)).

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AdjectiveEdit

acrimonious (comparative more acrimonious, superlative most acrimonious)

  1. Angry, acid, and sharp in delivering argumentative replies: bitter, mean-spirited, sharp in language or tone. [from early 17th c.]

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