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See also: Adamas, adamás, adāmas, and adāmās

Contents

LatinEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Ancient Greek ἀδάμας (adámas, unconquerable, invincible), either from ἀ- (a-, not) + δαμνάω (damnáō, conquer) or of Semitic origin.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

adamās m (genitive adamantis); third declension

  1. Adamant; the hardest steel or iron; diamond; an object made of adamant.
  2. Anything which is inflexible, firm or lasting.
  3. (figuratively, of one's character) Hard, unyielding, inexorable.

InflectionEdit

Third declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative adamās adamantēs
genitive adamantis adamantum
dative adamantī adamantibus
accusative adamantem adamantēs
ablative adamante adamantibus
vocative adamās adamantēs

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • adamas in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • adamas in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • du Cange, Charles (1883), “adamas”, in G. A. Louis Henschel, Pierre Carpentier, Léopold Favre, editors, Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (in Latin), Niort: L. Favre
  • adamas” in Félix Gaffiot’s Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette (1934)
  • adamas in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers

SpanishEdit

VerbEdit

adamas

  1. Informal second-person singular () present indicative form of adamar.