diamante

See also: diamanté

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French diamanté (adorned with diamonds)

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

diamante (plural diamantes)

  1. An artificial diamond used as adornment, such as a rhinestone.
  2. A diamante poem.

AdjectiveEdit

diamante (comparative more diamante, superlative most diamante)

  1. covered in diamante decorations
  2. shiny or iridescent, as if covered in or made of diamonds

AnagramsEdit


AfrikaansEdit

NounEdit

diamante

  1. plural of diamant

AsturianEdit

NounEdit

diamante m (plural diamantes)

  1. diamond

FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

diamante

  1. inflection of diamanter:
    1. first/third-person singular present indicative/subjunctive
    2. second-person singular imperative

AnagramsEdit


GalicianEdit

 
Galician Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia gl

NounEdit

diamante m (plural diamantes)

  1. diamond
  2. (card games) diamond (a playing card of the suit diamonds, diamantes)

ItalianEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Late Latin diamas, diamantis, from Latin adamās, adamantis, from Ancient Greek ἀδάμας (adámas, invincible, untamed; hard substance), from ἀ- (a-, un-) + δαμάζω (damázō, to overpower, tame, conquer), from Proto-Indo-European *demh₂-.

NounEdit

diamante m (plural diamanti)

  1. diamond (all senses)
  2. (sports, baseball) baseball field, ball field, sandlot baseball diamond
  3. The crown of an anchor
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

A calque of Dutch diamant, used by Dirck Voskens who first cut it around 1700, presumably naming it by analogy with the larger pearl.

NounEdit

diamante m (plural diamanti)

  1. excelsior (a small size of type, standardized to 3 point)

AnagramsEdit


PortugueseEdit

 diamante on Portuguese Wikipedia
 
diamante

EtymologyEdit

From Late Latin diamas, diamantis, from Latin adamās, adamantis, from Ancient Greek ἀδάμας (adámas, invincible, untamed; hard substance), from ἀ- (a-, un-) + δαμάζω (damázō, to overpower, tame, conquer), from Proto-Indo-European *demh₂-.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

diamante m (plural diamantes)

  1. Diamond

SpanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /djaˈmante/, [d̪jaˈmãn̪.t̪e]

Etymology 1Edit

From Old French diamant, from Latin adamās (hardest steel; diamond) (genitive singular adamantis), influenced by δια- (dia-); from Ancient Greek ἀδάμᾱς (adámās, unconquerable, invincible). More at English diamond.

NounEdit

diamante m (plural diamantes)

  1. diamond
  2. (card games) diamond (a playing card of the suit diamonds, diamantes)
Derived termsEdit
See alsoEdit
Suits in Spanish · palos (layout · text)
       
corazones diamantes picas tréboles

Etymology 2Edit

Calque of Dutch diamant, used by Dirck Voskens who first cut it around 1700, presumably naming it by analogy with the larger pearl.

NounEdit

diamante m (plural diamantes)

  1. excelsior (a small size of type, standardized to 3 point)

Further readingEdit