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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French inexorable, from Latin inexōrābilis (relentless, inexorable) (or directly from the Latin word), from in- (prefix meaning ‘not’) + exōrābilis (that may be moved or persuaded by entreaty; exorable).[1] Exōrābilis is derived from exōrāre[2] (from exōrō (to persuade, win over; to beg, entreat, plead), from ex- (prefix meaning ‘out of’) + ōrō (to beg, entreat, plead, pray; to deliver a speech, orate), from ōs (mouth), from Proto-Indo-European *h₃éh₁os (mouth)) + -bilis (suffix forming adjectives indicating a capacity or worth of being acted upon).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

inexorable (comparative more inexorable, superlative most inexorable)

  1. Impossible to prevent or stop; inevitable. [from mid 16th c.]
    • 2018, Anne Perkins, A Dad’s Army-style Brexit looms. ‘Don’t panic! in the Guardian.[1]
      No one, today, can miss the inexorable unfolding across the headlines and social media timelines of a transformed relationship between Britain and Europe.
  2. Unable to be persuaded; relentless; unrelenting. [from mid 16th c.]
  3. Adamant; severe.

AntonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

Further readingEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin inexorabilis.

AdjectiveEdit

inexorable (masculine and feminine plural inexorables)

  1. inexorable

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin inexōrābilis.

AdjectiveEdit

inexorable (plural inexorables)

  1. inexorable

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin inexorabilis.

AdjectiveEdit

inexorable (plural inexorables)

  1. inexorable

Related termsEdit