See also: Annex

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • Noun:
  • Verb:
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɛks

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from French annexe, from Latin annexus.

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

annex (plural annexes)

  1. An addition, an extension.
  2. An appendix to a book or document.
  3. An addition or extension to a building.
  4. An addition to the territory of a country or state, from a neighbouring country or state, normally by military force.

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English annexen, anexen, from Old French annexer (to join), from Medieval Latin annexāre, infinitive of annexō, frequentative of Latin annectō (bind to), from ad (to) + nectō (tie, bind).

VerbEdit

annex (third-person singular simple present annexes, present participle annexing, simple past and past participle annexed)

  1. To add something to another thing, especially territory; to incorporate.
    The ancient city of Petra was annexed by Rome.
  2. To attach or connect, as a consequence, condition, etc.
    • 1793, John Horne Tooke, The Constitution of England
      Under Edward the Second, the Commons began to annex petitions to the bills by which they granted subsidies
    to annex a penalty to a prohibition, or punishment to guilt
  3. (intransitive) To join; to be united.
SynonymsEdit
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CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin annexus.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

annex m (plural annexos)

  1. annex (an addition, an extension)
  2. annex (an addition to a building)

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit


SwedishEdit

NounEdit

annex n

  1. annex (an addition to a building)
  2. annex (an addition, an extension)

DeclensionEdit

Declension of annex 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative annex annexet annex annexen
Genitive annex annexets annex annexens