See also: fusé

EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

PronunciationEdit

  • enPR: fyo͞oz, IPA(key): /fjuːz/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: fuse
  • Rhymes: -uːz

Etymology 1Edit

From Italian fuso and French fusée, from Latin fūsus (spindle).

NounEdit

fuse (plural fuses)

  1. A cord that, when lit, conveys the fire to some explosive device.
    • 1962 October, “Talking of Trains: Passed to you, Mr. Macmillan”, in Modern Railways, page 220:
      The Government, having lit the fuse, is not going to be allowed to flee the explosion.
  2. (manufacturing, mining, military) The mechanism that ignites the charge in an explosive device; a detonator.
    Synonym: fuze
  3. (figuratively) A tendency to lose one's temper.
    When talking about being laid off, he has a short fuse.
  4. A friction match for smokers' use, having a bulbous head which when ignited is not easily blown out even in a gale of wind.
  5. A kind of match made of paper impregnated with niter and having the usual igniting tip.
Usage notesEdit

Professional publications about explosives and munitions distinguish the fuse and fuze spellings. The latter is preferred for the sense “mechanism that ignites the charge”.

Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

fuse (third-person singular simple present fuses, present participle fusing, simple past and past participle fused)

  1. To furnish with or install a fuse to an explosive device (see Usage notes for noun above)

Etymology 2Edit

Back-formation from fusion (to melt), first to verbal sense, then noun.

NounEdit

fuse (plural fuses)

  1. (electrical engineering) A device to prevent excessive overcurrent from overload or short circuit in an electrical circuit, containing a component that melts and interrupts the current when too high a load is passed through it.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

fuse (third-person singular simple present fuses, present participle fusing, simple past and past participle fused)

  1. (transitive) To liquify by heat; melt.
    • 1891, Dmitri Mendeleev, The Principles of Chemistry (1905) 3rd edition, Vol. 2, p.553, Tr. George Kamensky, of Основы химии (1867)
      Pure sodium is a lustrous metal... it fuses very easily at a temperature of 97°, and distils at a bright red heat (742°...)
  2. (transitive) To melt together; to blend; to mix indistinguishably.
    • 1960 January, “Talking of Trains: N.& W.-Virginian merger”, in Trains Illustrated, page 9:
      Actually the New York, New Haven and Hartford, Boston & Maine, Maine Central, Bangor & Aroostook and Rutland Railroads already are doing so; if they are fused, they would have a combined route mileage of 5,269 and assets totalling £318 million, [...].
  3. (intransitive) To melt together.
  4. (transitive, electricity) To furnish with or install a fuse to protect a circuit against overcurrent.
  5. (transitive, electricity, of a circuit) To have been protected against overcurrent by its fuse melting away, creating a gap in the wire, thus stopping the circuit from operating.
    When the bath overflowed, the downstairs lights fused, so we need a torch.
  6. (organic chemistry) To form a bicyclic compound from two similar or different types of ring such that two or more atoms are shared between the resulting rings
SynonymsEdit
TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

fuse

  1. inflection of fuser:
    1. first/third-person singular present indicative/subjunctive
    2. second-person singular imperative

ItalianEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈfu.ze/
  • Rhymes: -uze
  • Hyphenation: fù‧se

Etymology 1Edit

AdjectiveEdit

fuse f pl

  1. feminine plural of fuso

ParticipleEdit

fuse f pl

  1. feminine plural of fuso

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

fuse f pl

  1. plural of fusa

Etymology 3Edit

VerbEdit

fuse

  1. third-person singular past historic of fondere

LatinEdit

ParticipleEdit

fūse

  1. vocative masculine singular of fūsus

AdverbEdit

fūsē (comparative fūsius, superlative fūsissimē)

  1. widely, extensively
  2. in great detail
  3. loosely, roughly

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian BokmålEdit

VerbEdit

fuse (present tense fuser, past tense fuste, past participle fust)

  1. rush

AdjectiveEdit

fuse

  1. inflection of fus:
    1. definite singular
    2. plural

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • fusa (verb) (a infinitive)

VerbEdit

fuse (present tense fusar, past tense fusa, past participle fusa, passive infinitive fusast, present participle fusande, imperative fuse/fus)

  1. rush

AdjectiveEdit

fuse

  1. inflection of fus:
    1. definite singular
    2. plural
  2. neuter of fusen

ReferencesEdit


RomanianEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

VerbEdit

fuse

  1. third-person singular simple perfect indicative of fi: he/she has been
SynonymsEdit
  • fu (informal)

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

fuse n

  1. indefinite plural of fus

VenetianEdit

VerbEdit

fuse

  1. first-person singular imperfect subjunctive of èser
  2. third-person singular imperfect subjunctive of èser
  3. third-person plural imperfect subjunctive of èser