See also: ave, ave., 'ave, avé, avë, Ave, Ave., and AVE

Corsican edit

Etymology edit

From Latin habēre, present active infinitive of habeō, from Proto-Italic *habēō, from Proto-Indo-European *gʰeh₁bʰ- (to grab). Cognates include Italian avere and Romanian avea.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /aˈve/
  • Hyphenation: a‧vè

Verb edit

avè

  1. (transitive) to have
  2. (auxiliary, + past participle) Forms the perfect aspect; to have

Conjugation edit

References edit

  • avè” in INFCOR: Banca di dati di a lingua corsa
  • avè” in Aiaccinu: Cunghjugatori corsu

Haitian Creole edit

Etymology edit

From French avec.

Pronunciation edit

Preposition edit

avè

  1. with
    Synonyms: ak, avèk
    • (Can we date this quote?), Rit 1:16[1]:
      Kote ou prale, mwen prale avè ou. Kote ou rete, m'a rete avè ou. Se moun pa ou yo ki va moun pa m'. Bondye w'ap sèvi a, se li m'a sèvi tou.
      Wherever you will go, I will go with you. Wherever you will stay, I will stay with you. Your people will be my people. Your God will be my God.

Lombard edit

Etymology edit

From avere.

Verb edit

avè

  1. to have

Conjugation edit

The imperfect forms can be also the stem being removed (avèvièvi), and sometimes the forms containing -v- replaced by -r- (èvièri), due to the analogy with the unrelated verb vess (to be). When not used as an auxiliary verb, -(e)gh (after non-finite forms and imperatives) and gh'- (elsewhere) is added.

Neapolitan edit

Verb edit

avè

  1. Alternative spelling of avere (to have)

Romagnol edit

Verb edit

avè

  1. inflection of avér (to have):
    1. first-person singular past historic
    2. third-person singular/plural past historic