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EnglishEdit

 
A late development of the barque
 
The Russian 4-masted barque "Sedov" (built in Germany 1921) is still afloat.

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English barke 'boat', from Middle French barque, from Late Latin barca, from Vulgar Latin barica, from Ancient Greek βάρις (báris) (báris) 'Egyptian boat', from Coptic ⲃⲁⲁⲣⲉ (baare, small boat), from Egyptian bꜣjr (transport ship, type of fish),

    
   
 

Possibly cognate with Spanish barco.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

barque (plural barques)

  1. A sailing vessel of three or more masts, with all masts but the sternmost square-rigged, the sternmost being fore-and-aft-rigged
    • 1873 (published 1889, 1996), William Campbell, An Account of Missionary Success in the Island of Formosa, SMC Publishing Inc., page 279
      On being told, however, that the Norwegian barque Daphne was about to leave An-peng for Tamsui, I had my things taken on board, and we set sail a few hours later.
  2. (archaic) any small sailing vessel
  3. (poetic) a sailing vessel or boat of any kind

SynonymsEdit

  • (small vessel): see boat

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit


FrenchEdit

 
barque

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Italian barca. Doublet of barge

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /baʁk/
  • (file)

NounEdit

barque f (plural barques, diminutive barquette)

  1. small boat

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit