See also: Bible

EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English bible, from Middle Latin biblia (book) (misinterpreted as a feminine from earlier Latin neuter plural biblia (books)), from Ancient Greek βιβλία (biblía, books), plural of βιβλίον (biblíon, small book), originally a diminutive of βίβλος (bíblos, book), from βύβλος (búblos, papyrus) (from the ancient Phoenician city of Byblos which exported this writing material).

Old English used biblioþēce (from βιβλιοθήκη) and ġewritu (> English writs) for "the Scriptures".

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK, US) IPA(key): /ˈbaɪbəl/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -aɪbəl

NounEdit

bible (plural bibles)

  1. Alternative letter-case form of Bible (a specific version, edition, translation, or copy of the Christian religious text)
    • 2012 September 8, Cass Jones, “Elvis Presley's bible sells for £59,000”, in The Guardian[1]:
      The bible was used by Presley throughout his life until his death on 16 August 1977 and contains his handwritten notes, thoughts and annotations.
  2. Alternative letter-case form of Bible (the analogous holy book of another religion)
    • 1925, Etsu Inagaki Sugimoto, A Daughter of the Samurai, page 76:
      The Buddhist bible tells this story of Buddha’s time of temptation when he was living as a hermit on the Mount of Snow.
  3. (by extension) A comprehensive manual that describes something, or a publication with a loyal readership.
    handyman’s bible
    • 1995 June, Gary Wolf, “The Curse of Xanadu”, in Wired Magazine[2]:
      Computer Lib was written as a popular primer, but its most profound effect was on computer programmers, who needed little persuasion about the value of computers. [] Having set out to appeal to the general public, Nelson managed to publish an insider's bible and highly intimate guide to hacker culture.
    • 1995 September, Richard Barbrook; Andy Cameron, “The Californian Ideology”, in Mute[3], volume 1, number 3, ISSN 1356-7748:
      For example, Wired—the monthly bible of the ‘virtual class’—has uncritically reproduced the views of Newt Gingrich, []
  4. (nautical) Synonym of holystone: a piece of sandstone used for scouring wooden decks on ships.
  5. (at certain US universities) A compilation of problems and solutions from previous years of a given course, used by some students to cheat on tests or assignments.
    • 1965, Matt Fichtenbaum and Dan Murphy, “The Institute Screw” in The Broadside of Boston, vol. III, No. 22:
      My friend’s a genius, he will give me problems one through nine. The bible of a sophomore will have the needed lines.
  6. Omasum, the third compartment of the stomach of ruminants
    Synonyms: psalterium, omasum, manyplies, fardel
  7. (locksmithing) The upper part of a pin-tumbler lock, containing the driver pins and springs.

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit


CzechEdit

Proper nounEdit

bible f

  1. Bible

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • bible in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • bible in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bible f (plural bibles)

  1. bible (comprehensive text)

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French bible, from Medieval Latin biblia, from biblia), from Ancient Greek βιβλία (biblía).

PronunciationEdit

Proper nounEdit

bible

  1. The Bible (Christian holy book); a copy of the Bible.
  2. (rare) The Koran (Muslim holy book).

DescendantsEdit

  • English: Bible
  • Scots: Bible

ReferencesEdit

NounEdit

bible

  1. Any book that is of extensive length.
  2. A compendium, collection, or storehouse of books.

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit