See also: Deck and déck

English

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A ship with deck numbered 8.

Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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From Middle English dekke, borrowed from Middle Dutch dec (roof, covering), from Middle Dutch decken, from Old Dutch thecken, from Proto-West Germanic *þakkjan, from Proto-Germanic *þakjaną. Formed the same: German Decke (covering, blanket). Doublet of thatch and thack.

Noun

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deck (plural decks)

  1. Any raised flat surface that can be walked on: a balcony; a porch; a raised patio; a flat rooftop.
  2. (nautical) The floorlike covering of the horizontal sections, or compartments, of a ship. Small vessels have only one deck; larger ships have two or three decks.
    to swab the deck
    • 1910, Emerson Hough, chapter II, in The Purchase Price: Or The Cause of Compromise, Indianapolis, Ind.: The Bobbs-Merrill Company, →OCLC:
      Carried somehow, somewhither, for some reason, on these surging floods, were these travelers, []. Even such a boat as the Mount Vernon offered a total deck space so cramped as to leave secrecy or privacy well out of the question, even had the motley and democratic assemblage of passengers been disposed to accord either.
  3. (aviation) A main aeroplane surface, especially of a biplane or multiplane.
  4. (card games) A pack or set of playing cards.
  5. (card games, by extension) A set of cards owned by each individual player and from which they draw when playing.
    Synonym: library
  6. (journalism) A headline consisting of one or more full lines of text; especially, a subheadline.
    Hypernym: headline (sometimes coordinate)
    Coordinate term: strapline
    • 2005, Richard Keeble, Print Journalism: A Critical Introduction, page 114:
      If there's a strapline or subdeck, write these after the main deck and don't use the same words.
  7. A set of slides for a presentation.
    • 2011, David Kroenke, Donald Nilson, Office 365 in Business:
      Navigate to the location where your PowerPoint deck is stored and select it.
  8. (computing) A collection of cards (pages or forms) in systems such as WML (Wireless Markup Language) and HyperCard.
    • 2008, Johan Hjelm, Why IPTV?: Interactivity, Technologies, Services, page 13:
      The interaction model of WAP, originally developed for mobile phones to interact with information services in a web-like way, was based on Apple's HyperCard, and instead of pages, the user interacted with a deck of cards, which were interlinked by a scripting language.
  9. (obsolete) A heap or store.
    • 1655, Philip Massinger, The Guardian, act III, scene iii:
      A paper-blurrer, who on all occasions, / For all times, and all season, hath such trinkets / Ready in the deck
  10. (slang) A folded paper used for distributing illicit drugs.
    • 2007, Reports of cases argued and determined in the Supreme Court of New Jersey, volume 188:
      Defendant placed the decks in his pocket and, after driving out of the city, gave one to Shore. While still in the car, Shore snorted half of the deck. When they returned to defendant's home, defendant handed Shore a second deck of heroin.
  11. (colloquial) The floor.
    We hit the deck as bullets began to fly.
    • 2022 November 29, Ian Mitchelmore, “Wales put out of World Cup misery by England as sobering tournament must signal changing of the guard”, in WalesOnline[1]:
      Williams fell to the deck. Following a lengthy check, he was replaced by Connor Roberts due to a suspected concussion - a scenario well explained by the stadium's staff over the PA system.
  12. (theater) The stage.
  13. Short for tape deck.
    • 1985, Byte, volume 10, page 111:
      The general operating procedure for recording a tape is basically the same as for playing it. After you insert the tape in the deck, you fast forward it to the end and then completely rewind it.
Derived terms
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Terms derived from deck (noun)
Translations
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The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Verb

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deck (third-person singular simple present decks, present participle decking, simple past and past participle decked)

  1. (uncommon) To furnish with a deck, as a vessel.
  2. (informal) To knock someone to the floor, especially with a single punch.
    Wow, did you see her deck that guy who pinched her?
  3. (card games) To cause a player to run out of cards to draw, usually making them lose the game.
Translations
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Etymology 2

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From Middle English dekken, from Middle Dutch dekken (to cover), from Old Dutch thecken, from Proto-West Germanic *þakkjan, from Proto-Germanic *þakjaną (to roof; cover).

Verb

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deck (third-person singular simple present decks, present participle decking, simple past and past participle decked)

  1. (transitive, sometimes with out) To dress (someone) up, to clothe with more than ordinary elegance.
  2. (transitive, sometimes with out) To decorate (something).
  3. (transitive) To cover; to overspread.
    • 1667, John Milton, “Book V”, in Paradise Lost. [], London: [] [Samuel Simmons], and are to be sold by Peter Parker []; [a]nd by Robert Boulter []; [a]nd Matthias Walker, [], →OCLC; republished as Paradise Lost in Ten Books: [], London: Basil Montagu Pickering [], 1873, →OCLC:
      Whether to deck with clouds the uncoloured sky, / Or wet the thirsty earth with falling showers
Usage notes
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Derived terms
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Translations
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Central Franconian

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Etymology 1

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From Middle High German dicke, from Proto-Germanic *þekuz.

Pronunciation

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Adjective

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deck (masculine decke, feminine and plural decke or deck, comparative decker, superlative et deckste)

  1. (of things) thick
  2. (of living beings) fat

Adverb

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deck (comparative decker, superlative et decks)

  1. (archaic in some dialects) often, frequently
    Synonyms: (now predominant) off, oft
Alternative forms
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Etymology 2

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See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Pronunciation

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Verb

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deck

  1. inflection of decke:
    1. singular imperative
    2. third-person singular present
Alternative forms
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German

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Pronunciation

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Verb

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deck

  1. singular imperative of decken
  2. (colloquial) first-person singular present of decken

Italian

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Etymology

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Unadapted borrowing from English deck.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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deck m (invariable)

  1. tape deck

Luxembourgish

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Verb

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deck

  1. second-person singular imperative of decken

Romanian

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Etymology

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Borrowed from English deck.

Noun

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deck n (plural deckuri)

  1. tape deck

Declension

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